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Prevention of traveler's diarrhea.
Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1992 Jun; 6(2):333-54.ID

Abstract

Preventing traveler's diarrhea is usually a matter of common sense, good luck, and the host's ability to defend against enteric pathogens, particularly enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Untreated tap water, ice cubes, unpasteurized milk products, salads, food from street vendors, and dining in unhygienic-appearing restaurants should be avoided. Well-cooked food that is served hot and carbonated, commercially bottled beverages are usually safe. Food and water precautions, however, are no guarantee of success in preventing traveler's diarrhea. Bismuth subsalicylate used prophylactically is somewhat inconvenient and is only moderately effective. Although antibiotic prophylaxis is very effective for traveler's diarrhea, particularly the quinolones, it should be reserved for high-risk travelers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1624780

Citation

Tellier, R, and J S. Keystone. "Prevention of Traveler's Diarrhea." Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, vol. 6, no. 2, 1992, pp. 333-54.
Tellier R, Keystone JS. Prevention of traveler's diarrhea. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1992;6(2):333-54.
Tellier, R., & Keystone, J. S. (1992). Prevention of traveler's diarrhea. Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, 6(2), 333-54.
Tellier R, Keystone JS. Prevention of Traveler's Diarrhea. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1992;6(2):333-54. PubMed PMID: 1624780.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevention of traveler's diarrhea. AU - Tellier,R, AU - Keystone,J S, PY - 1992/6/1/pubmed PY - 1992/6/1/medline PY - 1992/6/1/entrez SP - 333 EP - 54 JF - Infectious disease clinics of North America JO - Infect Dis Clin North Am VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - Preventing traveler's diarrhea is usually a matter of common sense, good luck, and the host's ability to defend against enteric pathogens, particularly enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Untreated tap water, ice cubes, unpasteurized milk products, salads, food from street vendors, and dining in unhygienic-appearing restaurants should be avoided. Well-cooked food that is served hot and carbonated, commercially bottled beverages are usually safe. Food and water precautions, however, are no guarantee of success in preventing traveler's diarrhea. Bismuth subsalicylate used prophylactically is somewhat inconvenient and is only moderately effective. Although antibiotic prophylaxis is very effective for traveler's diarrhea, particularly the quinolones, it should be reserved for high-risk travelers. SN - 0891-5520 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1624780/Prevention_of_traveler's_diarrhea_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2258 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -