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Leprosy in wild armadillos.
Lepr Rev. 2005 Sep; 76(3):198-208.LR

Abstract

Wild nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) in the south central United States are highly endemic natural hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. Surveys conducted over the last 30 years on more than 5000 animals confirm that the infection is present among armadillos in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. Highest prevalence rates are found among the animals in low-lying alluvial and coastal areas, primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Both animal density and local factors may contribute to the detectability of armadillo leprosy in those regions. Little evidence for M. leprae infection is found among armadillos elsewhere in the US range, and only a few reports relate finding the infection among animals in Central or South America. However, the issue has received only scant attention in other countries. Armadillos only recently expanded their range into the US, and leprosy was present in Texas and Louisiana prior to the arrival of armadillos. The ecological relationship between humans and armadillos with M. leprae in this region remains unclear. However, infected armadillos constitute a large reservoir of M. leprae and they may be a source of infection for some humans in this country, and perhaps in other locations across the animal's range.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Hansen's Disease Program, DHHS/HRSA/BPHC, LSU-SVM, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA. rtrumal@lsu.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16248207

Citation

Truman, Richard. "Leprosy in Wild Armadillos." Leprosy Review, vol. 76, no. 3, 2005, pp. 198-208.
Truman R. Leprosy in wild armadillos. Lepr Rev. 2005;76(3):198-208.
Truman, R. (2005). Leprosy in wild armadillos. Leprosy Review, 76(3), 198-208.
Truman R. Leprosy in Wild Armadillos. Lepr Rev. 2005;76(3):198-208. PubMed PMID: 16248207.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leprosy in wild armadillos. A1 - Truman,Richard, PY - 2005/10/27/pubmed PY - 2005/11/11/medline PY - 2005/10/27/entrez SP - 198 EP - 208 JF - Leprosy review JO - Lepr Rev VL - 76 IS - 3 N2 - Wild nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) in the south central United States are highly endemic natural hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. Surveys conducted over the last 30 years on more than 5000 animals confirm that the infection is present among armadillos in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. Highest prevalence rates are found among the animals in low-lying alluvial and coastal areas, primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Both animal density and local factors may contribute to the detectability of armadillo leprosy in those regions. Little evidence for M. leprae infection is found among armadillos elsewhere in the US range, and only a few reports relate finding the infection among animals in Central or South America. However, the issue has received only scant attention in other countries. Armadillos only recently expanded their range into the US, and leprosy was present in Texas and Louisiana prior to the arrival of armadillos. The ecological relationship between humans and armadillos with M. leprae in this region remains unclear. However, infected armadillos constitute a large reservoir of M. leprae and they may be a source of infection for some humans in this country, and perhaps in other locations across the animal's range. SN - 0305-7518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16248207/Leprosy_in_wild_armadillos_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/mycobacterialinfections.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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