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T-cell receptor-like antibodies: novel reagents for clinical cancer immunology and immunotherapy.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2005; 5(3):523-36ER

Abstract

Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules play a central role in the immune response against a variety of cells that have undergone malignant transformation by shaping the T-cell repertoire and presenting peptide antigens from endogeneous antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. Diseased tumor or virus-infected cells are present on class I major histocompatibility complex molecule peptides that are derived from tumor-associated antigens or viral-derived proteins. Due to their unique specificity, such major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes are a desirable target for novel approaches in immunotherapy. Targeted delivery of toxins or other cytotoxic drugs to cells which express specific major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes that are involved in the immune response against cancer or viral infections would allow for a specific immunotherapeutic treatment of these diseases. It has recently been demonstrated that antibodies with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T-cells can be generated by taking advantage of the selection power of phage display technology. In addition to their tumor targeting capabilities, antibodies that mimic the fine specificity of T-cell receptors can serve as valuable research reagents that enable study of human class I peptide-major histocompatibility complex ligand presentation, as well as T-cell receptor peptide-major histocompatibility complex interactions. T-cell receptor-like antibody molecules may prove to be useful tools for studying major histocompatibility complex class I antigen presentation in health and disease as well as for therapeutic purposes in cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Faculty of Biology, Haifa 32000, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16250828

Citation

Noy, Roy, et al. "T-cell Receptor-like Antibodies: Novel Reagents for Clinical Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy." Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, vol. 5, no. 3, 2005, pp. 523-36.
Noy R, Eppel M, Haus-Cohen M, et al. T-cell receptor-like antibodies: novel reagents for clinical cancer immunology and immunotherapy. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2005;5(3):523-36.
Noy, R., Eppel, M., Haus-Cohen, M., Klechevsky, E., Mekler, O., Michaeli, Y., ... Reiter, Y. (2005). T-cell receptor-like antibodies: novel reagents for clinical cancer immunology and immunotherapy. Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, 5(3), pp. 523-36.
Noy R, et al. T-cell Receptor-like Antibodies: Novel Reagents for Clinical Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2005;5(3):523-36. PubMed PMID: 16250828.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - T-cell receptor-like antibodies: novel reagents for clinical cancer immunology and immunotherapy. AU - Noy,Roy, AU - Eppel,Malka, AU - Haus-Cohen,Maya, AU - Klechevsky,Einav, AU - Mekler,Orian, AU - Michaeli,Yaeil, AU - Denkberg,Galit, AU - Reiter,Yoram, PY - 2005/10/28/pubmed PY - 2006/2/8/medline PY - 2005/10/28/entrez SP - 523 EP - 36 JF - Expert review of anticancer therapy JO - Expert Rev Anticancer Ther VL - 5 IS - 3 N2 - Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules play a central role in the immune response against a variety of cells that have undergone malignant transformation by shaping the T-cell repertoire and presenting peptide antigens from endogeneous antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. Diseased tumor or virus-infected cells are present on class I major histocompatibility complex molecule peptides that are derived from tumor-associated antigens or viral-derived proteins. Due to their unique specificity, such major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes are a desirable target for novel approaches in immunotherapy. Targeted delivery of toxins or other cytotoxic drugs to cells which express specific major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes that are involved in the immune response against cancer or viral infections would allow for a specific immunotherapeutic treatment of these diseases. It has recently been demonstrated that antibodies with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T-cells can be generated by taking advantage of the selection power of phage display technology. In addition to their tumor targeting capabilities, antibodies that mimic the fine specificity of T-cell receptors can serve as valuable research reagents that enable study of human class I peptide-major histocompatibility complex ligand presentation, as well as T-cell receptor peptide-major histocompatibility complex interactions. T-cell receptor-like antibody molecules may prove to be useful tools for studying major histocompatibility complex class I antigen presentation in health and disease as well as for therapeutic purposes in cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders. SN - 1744-8328 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16250828/T_cell_receptor_like_antibodies:_novel_reagents_for_clinical_cancer_immunology_and_immunotherapy_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/14737140.5.3.523 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -