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Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes.

Abstract

This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P < .05) to reduced sufficiency of vegetables and fruit and higher consumption of meat and alternatives and added fats. The low-carbohydrate-density diet resulted in intakes lower in vitamin C and fiber and higher in cholesterol and total fat. The low-carbohydrate-density diet was directly associated with being Canadian-born (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27 to 2.50), overweight status (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.57), smoking (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.23 to 1.90), alcohol use (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.75), and poorer self-rated health (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.01 to 2.14). Use of the acceptable macronutrient distribution range identified adolescents with low-carbohydrate-density diets whose food choices and nutrient intake may impact negatively on short- and long-term health.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Linda_Greene-Finestone@hc-sc.gc.ca

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adolescent Behavior
    Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Alcohol Drinking
    Child
    Cluster Analysis
    Confidence Intervals
    Diet
    Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted
    Dietary Carbohydrates
    Exercise
    Female
    Health Behavior
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Male
    Micronutrients
    Nutritive Value
    Obesity
    Odds Ratio
    Ontario
    Smoking
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16256764

    Citation

    Greene-Finestone, Linda S., et al. "Adolescents' Low-carbohydrate-density Diets Are Related to Poorer Dietary Intakes." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 105, no. 11, 2005, pp. 1783-8.
    Greene-Finestone LS, Campbell MK, Evers SE, et al. Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(11):1783-8.
    Greene-Finestone, L. S., Campbell, M. K., Evers, S. E., & Gutmanis, I. A. (2005). Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 105(11), pp. 1783-8.
    Greene-Finestone LS, et al. Adolescents' Low-carbohydrate-density Diets Are Related to Poorer Dietary Intakes. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(11):1783-8. PubMed PMID: 16256764.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes. AU - Greene-Finestone,Linda S, AU - Campbell,M Karen, AU - Evers,Susan E, AU - Gutmanis,Iris A, PY - 2004/05/13/received PY - 2005/11/1/pubmed PY - 2006/2/16/medline PY - 2005/11/1/entrez SP - 1783 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 105 IS - 11 N2 - This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P < .05) to reduced sufficiency of vegetables and fruit and higher consumption of meat and alternatives and added fats. The low-carbohydrate-density diet resulted in intakes lower in vitamin C and fiber and higher in cholesterol and total fat. The low-carbohydrate-density diet was directly associated with being Canadian-born (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27 to 2.50), overweight status (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.57), smoking (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.23 to 1.90), alcohol use (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.75), and poorer self-rated health (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.01 to 2.14). Use of the acceptable macronutrient distribution range identified adolescents with low-carbohydrate-density diets whose food choices and nutrient intake may impact negatively on short- and long-term health. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16256764/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(05)01388-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -