Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Voluntary stimulus production enhances deviance processing in the brain.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2006 Jan; 59(1):15-21.IJ

Abstract

Humans often get information by voluntary action. However, little is known about how stimulus processing is modulated by self-production of stimuli. In the present study, event-related brain potentials were recorded from 16 student volunteers performing an auditory three-stimulus oddball task in two conditions. In the self condition, the stimuli were triggered by participants' voluntary button presses. In the auto condition, the same stimuli were presented automatically by a computer with the same interstimulus intervals as those in the self condition. Perceptually deviant nontarget stimuli elicited a larger P3 and a larger subsequent positivity in the self condition than in the auto condition, whereas low-deviant target stimuli elicited a P3 with equally high amplitude in both conditions. The findings suggest that voluntary stimulus production enhances orienting of attention (reflected in the P3a component) and subsequent memory updating (reflected in the P3b component) for deviant stimuli, but does not affect the response to task-relevant stimuli. Voluntary action may activate the perceptual representation of its most frequent outcomes and this anticipatory activation may make deviant stimuli more salient in the context.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521, Japan. nittono@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16257077

Citation

Nittono, Hiroshi. "Voluntary Stimulus Production Enhances Deviance Processing in the Brain." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 59, no. 1, 2006, pp. 15-21.
Nittono H. Voluntary stimulus production enhances deviance processing in the brain. Int J Psychophysiol. 2006;59(1):15-21.
Nittono, H. (2006). Voluntary stimulus production enhances deviance processing in the brain. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 59(1), 15-21.
Nittono H. Voluntary Stimulus Production Enhances Deviance Processing in the Brain. Int J Psychophysiol. 2006;59(1):15-21. PubMed PMID: 16257077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Voluntary stimulus production enhances deviance processing in the brain. A1 - Nittono,Hiroshi, Y1 - 2005/10/27/ PY - 2005/03/15/received PY - 2005/06/16/accepted PY - 2005/11/1/pubmed PY - 2006/3/31/medline PY - 2005/11/1/entrez SP - 15 EP - 21 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 59 IS - 1 N2 - Humans often get information by voluntary action. However, little is known about how stimulus processing is modulated by self-production of stimuli. In the present study, event-related brain potentials were recorded from 16 student volunteers performing an auditory three-stimulus oddball task in two conditions. In the self condition, the stimuli were triggered by participants' voluntary button presses. In the auto condition, the same stimuli were presented automatically by a computer with the same interstimulus intervals as those in the self condition. Perceptually deviant nontarget stimuli elicited a larger P3 and a larger subsequent positivity in the self condition than in the auto condition, whereas low-deviant target stimuli elicited a P3 with equally high amplitude in both conditions. The findings suggest that voluntary stimulus production enhances orienting of attention (reflected in the P3a component) and subsequent memory updating (reflected in the P3b component) for deviant stimuli, but does not affect the response to task-relevant stimuli. Voluntary action may activate the perceptual representation of its most frequent outcomes and this anticipatory activation may make deviant stimuli more salient in the context. SN - 0167-8760 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16257077/Voluntary_stimulus_production_enhances_deviance_processing_in_the_brain_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(05)00227-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -