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[Eating disorders as risk factors for osteoporosis].
Salud Publica Mex 2005 Jul-Aug; 47(4):308-18SP

Abstract

Eating disorders (TCA per its abbreviation in Spanish) are common in young women, with an estimated prevalence of 4-5%. One of the physical complications of eating disorders, especially anorexia nervosa (AN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (TANE) is bone mass loss, which affects both cortical and trabecular bone. The synergistic effect of malnutrition and estrogen deficiency produces significant bone mass loss, resulting from the uncoupling of bone turnover characterized by a decrease in osteoblastic bone formation and an increase in osteclastic bone resorption. The mechanisms implied in the pathogenesis of bone loss are the hypoestrogenism, hypercortisolism, serum leptin levels and insulin-like growth factor decrease. Severity of bone loss in anorexia nervosa varies depending on duration of illness, the minimal weight ever and sedentarism or strenuous exercise. Long term consequences occur, such as a fracture risk increase in patients who have suffered anorexia nervosa, compared with the general population. The first treatment line to recover bone mass is nutritional rehabilitation together with weight gain. Hormonal replacement therapy may be effective if combined with an anabolic method. Osteopenia and osteoporosis are terms adopted to define the deficiency of bone mass in adults. Authors have used these terms to define densitometric data in young subjects who have not reached their peak bone mass. We suggest the term "hypo-osteogenesia" to define the deficiency in the development of bone mass in adolescents or children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Grupo Médico Río Mayo, Fundación Ariwá para el Tratamiento, Prevención e Investigación de los Trastornos de la Conducta Alimentaria, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. terenut@prodigy.net.mxNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

spa

PubMed ID

16259293

Citation

Rivera-Gallardo, Ma Teresa, et al. "[Eating Disorders as Risk Factors for Osteoporosis]." Salud Publica De Mexico, vol. 47, no. 4, 2005, pp. 308-18.
Rivera-Gallardo MT, Ma del Socorro PC, Barriguete-Meléndez JA. [Eating disorders as risk factors for osteoporosis]. Salud Publica Mex. 2005;47(4):308-18.
Rivera-Gallardo, M. T., Ma del Socorro, P. C., & Barriguete-Meléndez, J. A. (2005). [Eating disorders as risk factors for osteoporosis]. Salud Publica De Mexico, 47(4), pp. 308-18.
Rivera-Gallardo MT, Ma del Socorro PC, Barriguete-Meléndez JA. [Eating Disorders as Risk Factors for Osteoporosis]. Salud Publica Mex. 2005;47(4):308-18. PubMed PMID: 16259293.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Eating disorders as risk factors for osteoporosis]. AU - Rivera-Gallardo,Ma Teresa, AU - Ma del Socorro,Parra-Cabrera, AU - Barriguete-Meléndez,Jorge Armando, PY - 2005/11/2/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/11/2/entrez SP - 308 EP - 18 JF - Salud publica de Mexico JO - Salud Publica Mex VL - 47 IS - 4 N2 - Eating disorders (TCA per its abbreviation in Spanish) are common in young women, with an estimated prevalence of 4-5%. One of the physical complications of eating disorders, especially anorexia nervosa (AN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (TANE) is bone mass loss, which affects both cortical and trabecular bone. The synergistic effect of malnutrition and estrogen deficiency produces significant bone mass loss, resulting from the uncoupling of bone turnover characterized by a decrease in osteoblastic bone formation and an increase in osteclastic bone resorption. The mechanisms implied in the pathogenesis of bone loss are the hypoestrogenism, hypercortisolism, serum leptin levels and insulin-like growth factor decrease. Severity of bone loss in anorexia nervosa varies depending on duration of illness, the minimal weight ever and sedentarism or strenuous exercise. Long term consequences occur, such as a fracture risk increase in patients who have suffered anorexia nervosa, compared with the general population. The first treatment line to recover bone mass is nutritional rehabilitation together with weight gain. Hormonal replacement therapy may be effective if combined with an anabolic method. Osteopenia and osteoporosis are terms adopted to define the deficiency of bone mass in adults. Authors have used these terms to define densitometric data in young subjects who have not reached their peak bone mass. We suggest the term "hypo-osteogenesia" to define the deficiency in the development of bone mass in adolescents or children. SN - 0036-3634 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16259293/[Eating_disorders_as_risk_factors_for_osteoporosis]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9059 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -