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Hemoglobin A1c levels in diagnosed and undiagnosed black, Hispanic, and white persons with diabetes: results from NHANES 1999-2000.
Ethn Dis. 2005 Autumn; 15(4):562-7.ED

Abstract

PURPOSE

Although the prevalence of diabetes among various racial/ethnic groups has been well studied, little is known about the racial/ ethnic differences in Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes. HbA1c correlates with morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Knowledge of the racial/ethnic differences in HbA1c would impact screening and intervention in primary care settings. This study describes racial/ethnic differences in HbA1c among US Black, Hispanic, and White diagnosed and undiagnosed persons with diabetes.

METHODS

This study included participants in the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey who were > or =20 years old with a HbA1c measurement. The association between HbA1c and race in diagnosed and undiagnosed persons with diabetes (with body mass index [BMI] and age as covariates) was determined. The distribution of HbA1c and mean HbA1c in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and the rates of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes with their corresponding HbA1c levels are described by race/ethnicity.

RESULTS

Estimated diabetes prevalence in US persons > or =20 years is 8.2%, with 2.3% having undiagnosed diabetes. Whites with diabetes had lower mean HbA1c levels (7.6%, standard error [SEI 0.2) than Blacks (8.1%, SE 0.3) or Hispanics (8.2%, SE .3). Whites with diagnosed diabetes were less likely to have HbA1c> or =11% (1.7%) than Blacks (11.1%) or Hispanics (10.4%). Hispanics with undiagnosed diabetes were more likely to have HbA1c-7% (60.5%) than Blacks (39.3%) or Whites (37.8%).

CONCLUSIONS

Significant numbers of persons with diabetes are undiagnosed. There are significant racial/ethnic differences in HbA1c levels, which are significantly higher in Blacks and Hispanics. Comprehensive risk-based screening and intervention for diabetes is needed in order to address racial and ethnic disparities, especially in minorities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mercer University School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Macon, GA 31206, USA. boltri.john@mccg.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16259477

Citation

Boltri, John M., et al. "Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Black, Hispanic, and White Persons With Diabetes: Results From NHANES 1999-2000." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 15, no. 4, 2005, pp. 562-7.
Boltri JM, Okosun IS, Davis-Smith M, et al. Hemoglobin A1c levels in diagnosed and undiagnosed black, Hispanic, and white persons with diabetes: results from NHANES 1999-2000. Ethn Dis. 2005;15(4):562-7.
Boltri, J. M., Okosun, I. S., Davis-Smith, M., & Vogel, R. L. (2005). Hemoglobin A1c levels in diagnosed and undiagnosed black, Hispanic, and white persons with diabetes: results from NHANES 1999-2000. Ethnicity & Disease, 15(4), 562-7.
Boltri JM, et al. Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Black, Hispanic, and White Persons With Diabetes: Results From NHANES 1999-2000. Ethn Dis. 2005;15(4):562-7. PubMed PMID: 16259477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hemoglobin A1c levels in diagnosed and undiagnosed black, Hispanic, and white persons with diabetes: results from NHANES 1999-2000. AU - Boltri,John M, AU - Okosun,Ike S, AU - Davis-Smith,Monique, AU - Vogel,Robert L, PY - 2005/11/2/pubmed PY - 2006/3/1/medline PY - 2005/11/2/entrez SP - 562 EP - 7 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: Although the prevalence of diabetes among various racial/ethnic groups has been well studied, little is known about the racial/ ethnic differences in Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes. HbA1c correlates with morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Knowledge of the racial/ethnic differences in HbA1c would impact screening and intervention in primary care settings. This study describes racial/ethnic differences in HbA1c among US Black, Hispanic, and White diagnosed and undiagnosed persons with diabetes. METHODS: This study included participants in the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey who were > or =20 years old with a HbA1c measurement. The association between HbA1c and race in diagnosed and undiagnosed persons with diabetes (with body mass index [BMI] and age as covariates) was determined. The distribution of HbA1c and mean HbA1c in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and the rates of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes with their corresponding HbA1c levels are described by race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Estimated diabetes prevalence in US persons > or =20 years is 8.2%, with 2.3% having undiagnosed diabetes. Whites with diabetes had lower mean HbA1c levels (7.6%, standard error [SEI 0.2) than Blacks (8.1%, SE 0.3) or Hispanics (8.2%, SE .3). Whites with diagnosed diabetes were less likely to have HbA1c> or =11% (1.7%) than Blacks (11.1%) or Hispanics (10.4%). Hispanics with undiagnosed diabetes were more likely to have HbA1c-7% (60.5%) than Blacks (39.3%) or Whites (37.8%). CONCLUSIONS: Significant numbers of persons with diabetes are undiagnosed. There are significant racial/ethnic differences in HbA1c levels, which are significantly higher in Blacks and Hispanics. Comprehensive risk-based screening and intervention for diabetes is needed in order to address racial and ethnic disparities, especially in minorities. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16259477/Hemoglobin_A1c_levels_in_diagnosed_and_undiagnosed_black_Hispanic_and_white_persons_with_diabetes:_results_from_NHANES_1999_2000_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2236 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -