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Reduced capacity of whole blood leucocytes to express tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 following major orthopaedic surgery.
Eur Surg Res. 2005 Jul-Aug; 37(4):210-5.ES

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Severe trauma is a challenge to the immune response and may cause reduced immune capacity. As a marker of decreased cellular activity, studies with ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of whole blood or isolated mononuclear cells from injured patients have revealed reduced production of inflammatory cytokines. To gain further insight into immune alterations in orthopaedic surgery, we studied LPS-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-10 in whole blood of patients during peri- and postoperative phases of total hip replacement.

METHODS

Four females and 3 males undergoing elective total hip replacement were included in the study. Ex vivo LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-10 were measured in a whole blood assay before, during and at 1 and 6 days after operation. In addition, the counts of white blood cells were determined.

RESULTS

During the operation, there were significant reductions in the number of monocytes, but at day 1 and 6 after surgery, there were significant increases as compared to the levels before surgery. The capacity of whole blood to express TNF-alpha and IL-10 did not change significantly during the operation and the following postoperative day. At day 6, however, there were significant reductions in expression of both TNF-alpha and IL-10 as compared to the levels before the operation. In relation to the values of monocytes, there was a significant reduction in the expression of TNF-alpha also at day 1 after operation.

CONCLUSION

Our data indicate that in the course of at least 6 days after a major orthopaedic trauma, there is suppression of the whole blood capacity to express the inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 when exposed to LPS. During this time, then, the patient is particular susceptible to septic complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopaedics, Rikshospitalet University Clinic, Oslo, Norway. olav.reikeras@ikshospitalet.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16260870

Citation

Reikeraas, O, et al. "Reduced Capacity of Whole Blood Leucocytes to Express Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha and Interleukin-10 Following Major Orthopaedic Surgery." European Surgical Research. Europaische Chirurgische Forschung. Recherches Chirurgicales Europeennes, vol. 37, no. 4, 2005, pp. 210-5.
Reikeraas O, Sun J, Krohn CD, et al. Reduced capacity of whole blood leucocytes to express tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 following major orthopaedic surgery. Eur Surg Res. 2005;37(4):210-5.
Reikeraas, O., Sun, J., Krohn, C. D., Wang, J. E., & Aasen, A. O. (2005). Reduced capacity of whole blood leucocytes to express tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 following major orthopaedic surgery. European Surgical Research. Europaische Chirurgische Forschung. Recherches Chirurgicales Europeennes, 37(4), 210-5.
Reikeraas O, et al. Reduced Capacity of Whole Blood Leucocytes to Express Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha and Interleukin-10 Following Major Orthopaedic Surgery. Eur Surg Res. 2005 Jul-Aug;37(4):210-5. PubMed PMID: 16260870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reduced capacity of whole blood leucocytes to express tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 following major orthopaedic surgery. AU - Reikeraas,O, AU - Sun,J, AU - Krohn,C D, AU - Wang,J E, AU - Aasen,A O, PY - 2005/02/16/received PY - 2005/05/10/accepted PY - 2005/11/2/pubmed PY - 2006/2/9/medline PY - 2005/11/2/entrez SP - 210 EP - 5 JF - European surgical research. Europaische chirurgische Forschung. Recherches chirurgicales europeennes JO - Eur Surg Res VL - 37 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Severe trauma is a challenge to the immune response and may cause reduced immune capacity. As a marker of decreased cellular activity, studies with ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of whole blood or isolated mononuclear cells from injured patients have revealed reduced production of inflammatory cytokines. To gain further insight into immune alterations in orthopaedic surgery, we studied LPS-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-10 in whole blood of patients during peri- and postoperative phases of total hip replacement. METHODS: Four females and 3 males undergoing elective total hip replacement were included in the study. Ex vivo LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-10 were measured in a whole blood assay before, during and at 1 and 6 days after operation. In addition, the counts of white blood cells were determined. RESULTS: During the operation, there were significant reductions in the number of monocytes, but at day 1 and 6 after surgery, there were significant increases as compared to the levels before surgery. The capacity of whole blood to express TNF-alpha and IL-10 did not change significantly during the operation and the following postoperative day. At day 6, however, there were significant reductions in expression of both TNF-alpha and IL-10 as compared to the levels before the operation. In relation to the values of monocytes, there was a significant reduction in the expression of TNF-alpha also at day 1 after operation. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that in the course of at least 6 days after a major orthopaedic trauma, there is suppression of the whole blood capacity to express the inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 when exposed to LPS. During this time, then, the patient is particular susceptible to septic complications. SN - 0014-312X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16260870/Reduced_capacity_of_whole_blood_leucocytes_to_express_tumour_necrosis_factor_alpha_and_interleukin_10_following_major_orthopaedic_surgery_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000087865 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -