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Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on mood, social support, and a marker of antiviral immunity are maintained up to 1 year in HIV-infected gay men.
Int J Behav Med 2005; 12(4):218-26IJ

Abstract

Numerous herpesvirus infections are associated with clinically relevant outcomes as well as an accelerated HIV replication rate and subsequent disease progression. Stress management interventions may improve markers of cellular immune control over latent herpesvirus infections and these changes appear to be mediated by perceptions of increased social support availability. We examined the effects of a group-based cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on distress, dysphoria, perceived social support, and herpesvirus immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers during the 6 to 12 months following the intervention. Of those who were initially randomized, 49 HIV-infected men were followed during the 6- to 12-month period after randomization to either a 10-week CBSM intervention (n = 31) or a modified wait-list control condition (n = 18). Measures of distress, dysphoria, social support, and blood samples for herpesvirus IgG titers were taken at baseline, immediately following CBSM and at 6- to 12-month follow-up. Men in CBSM displayed maintenance of previously observed intervention effects on dysphoria, reliable alliance support, and herpesvirus IgG antibody titers (i.e., Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen; EBV-VCA). Intervention-related changes in EBV-VCA were unrelated to changes in lymphocyte subsets (i.e., CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+:CD8+) or changes in measures of dysphoria and social support during the investigation period. Data indicate that HIV-infected men participating in a CBSM intervention maintain better psychosocial status and immunologic control of latent EBV infection up to 1 year after its conclusion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Miami, 5665 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Coral Gables, FL 33146, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16262540

Citation

Carrico, Adam W., et al. "Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Effects On Mood, Social Support, and a Marker of Antiviral Immunity Are Maintained Up to 1 Year in HIV-infected Gay Men." International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 12, no. 4, 2005, pp. 218-26.
Carrico AW, Antoni MH, Pereira DB, et al. Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on mood, social support, and a marker of antiviral immunity are maintained up to 1 year in HIV-infected gay men. Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):218-26.
Carrico, A. W., Antoni, M. H., Pereira, D. B., Fletcher, M. A., Klimas, N., Lechner, S. C., & Schneiderman, N. (2005). Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on mood, social support, and a marker of antiviral immunity are maintained up to 1 year in HIV-infected gay men. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 12(4), pp. 218-26.
Carrico AW, et al. Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Effects On Mood, Social Support, and a Marker of Antiviral Immunity Are Maintained Up to 1 Year in HIV-infected Gay Men. Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):218-26. PubMed PMID: 16262540.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on mood, social support, and a marker of antiviral immunity are maintained up to 1 year in HIV-infected gay men. AU - Carrico,Adam W, AU - Antoni,Michael H, AU - Pereira,Deidre B, AU - Fletcher,Mary Ann, AU - Klimas,Nancy, AU - Lechner,Suzanne C, AU - Schneiderman,Neil, PY - 2005/11/3/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/11/3/entrez SP - 218 EP - 26 JF - International journal of behavioral medicine JO - Int J Behav Med VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - Numerous herpesvirus infections are associated with clinically relevant outcomes as well as an accelerated HIV replication rate and subsequent disease progression. Stress management interventions may improve markers of cellular immune control over latent herpesvirus infections and these changes appear to be mediated by perceptions of increased social support availability. We examined the effects of a group-based cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on distress, dysphoria, perceived social support, and herpesvirus immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers during the 6 to 12 months following the intervention. Of those who were initially randomized, 49 HIV-infected men were followed during the 6- to 12-month period after randomization to either a 10-week CBSM intervention (n = 31) or a modified wait-list control condition (n = 18). Measures of distress, dysphoria, social support, and blood samples for herpesvirus IgG titers were taken at baseline, immediately following CBSM and at 6- to 12-month follow-up. Men in CBSM displayed maintenance of previously observed intervention effects on dysphoria, reliable alliance support, and herpesvirus IgG antibody titers (i.e., Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen; EBV-VCA). Intervention-related changes in EBV-VCA were unrelated to changes in lymphocyte subsets (i.e., CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+:CD8+) or changes in measures of dysphoria and social support during the investigation period. Data indicate that HIV-infected men participating in a CBSM intervention maintain better psychosocial status and immunologic control of latent EBV infection up to 1 year after its conclusion. SN - 1070-5503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16262540/Cognitive_behavioral_stress_management_effects_on_mood_social_support_and_a_marker_of_antiviral_immunity_are_maintained_up_to_1_year_in_HIV_infected_gay_men_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=16262540.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -