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Sequelae of traveler's diarrhea: focus on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Dec 01; 41 Suppl 8:S577-86.CI

Abstract

Traveler's diarrhea is usually an acute, self-limited illness; however, in some patients, enteric symptoms can persist for weeks, months, or years. It has been estimated that up to 3% of patients with traveler's diarrhea have symptoms for >30 days. The differential diagnosis includes persistent infection, coinfection, temporary postinfection phenomena, or malabsorptive syndromes. Once these possibilities are excluded, and if symptoms persist, a diagnosis of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) becomes more likely. PI-IBS has recently become a topic of considerable clinical and investigative interest, because evidence validating it as a diagnosis and elucidating its pathophysiological mechanisms has accumulated. Epidemiological evidence suggests that PI-IBS is a relatively common sequela of acute gastroenteritis. Experimental evidence suggests that chronic inflammation following acute bacterial infection has a pathophysiological role in the development of PI-IBS. A fuller understanding of these pathophysiological mechanisms will lead to a more directed therapeutic approach and, perhaps, a reevaluation of prophylaxis for traveler's diarrhea as a means of primary prevention of PI-IBS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, The New York Center for Travel and Tropical Medicine, New York, NY, USA. bconnor@pol.net

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16267722

Citation

Connor, Bradley A.. "Sequelae of Traveler's Diarrhea: Focus On Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 41 Suppl 8, 2005, pp. S577-86.
Connor BA. Sequelae of traveler's diarrhea: focus on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;41 Suppl 8:S577-86.
Connor, B. A. (2005). Sequelae of traveler's diarrhea: focus on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 41 Suppl 8, S577-86.
Connor BA. Sequelae of Traveler's Diarrhea: Focus On Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Dec 1;41 Suppl 8:S577-86. PubMed PMID: 16267722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sequelae of traveler's diarrhea: focus on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. A1 - Connor,Bradley A, PY - 2005/11/4/pubmed PY - 2007/1/16/medline PY - 2005/11/4/entrez SP - S577 EP - 86 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 41 Suppl 8 N2 - Traveler's diarrhea is usually an acute, self-limited illness; however, in some patients, enteric symptoms can persist for weeks, months, or years. It has been estimated that up to 3% of patients with traveler's diarrhea have symptoms for >30 days. The differential diagnosis includes persistent infection, coinfection, temporary postinfection phenomena, or malabsorptive syndromes. Once these possibilities are excluded, and if symptoms persist, a diagnosis of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) becomes more likely. PI-IBS has recently become a topic of considerable clinical and investigative interest, because evidence validating it as a diagnosis and elucidating its pathophysiological mechanisms has accumulated. Epidemiological evidence suggests that PI-IBS is a relatively common sequela of acute gastroenteritis. Experimental evidence suggests that chronic inflammation following acute bacterial infection has a pathophysiological role in the development of PI-IBS. A fuller understanding of these pathophysiological mechanisms will lead to a more directed therapeutic approach and, perhaps, a reevaluation of prophylaxis for traveler's diarrhea as a means of primary prevention of PI-IBS. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16267722/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/432956 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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