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Increased responsiveness to MDMA in adult rats treated neonatally with MDMA.
Neurotoxicol Teratol 2006 Jan-Feb; 28(1):95-102NT

Abstract

MDMA [(+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as ecstasy] is a popular recreational drug among women of reproductive age. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term neurobehavioral consequences of early developmental MDMA exposure. On postnatal days (PD) 1-4, Sprague-Dawley rats received two 10 mg/kg injections of MDMA with an inter-dose interval of 4 h. Male subjects were tested in adulthood for their performance in an object-recognition memory task and for their thermal and behavioral responses to an acute MDMA challenge (10 mg/kg i.p.). Neonatal MDMA administration did not alter working memory in the object-recognition test in young adulthood (PD 68-73) and there were no differences in radiolabeled citalopram binding to the serotonin transporter at this age. However, the pretreated animals showed increased thermal dysregulation and serotonin syndrome responses (particularly headweaving stereotypy) following the MDMA challenge. These results add to the growing literature demonstrating that developmental MDMA administration can lead to long-lasting functional abnormalities, and they further suggest that the offspring of ecstasy-using women may be at risk for enhanced sensitivity to this drug due to their earlier exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroscience and Behavior Program, Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-7710, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16271852

Citation

Piper, Brian J., and Jerrold S. Meyer. "Increased Responsiveness to MDMA in Adult Rats Treated Neonatally With MDMA." Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 28, no. 1, 2006, pp. 95-102.
Piper BJ, Meyer JS. Increased responsiveness to MDMA in adult rats treated neonatally with MDMA. Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2006;28(1):95-102.
Piper, B. J., & Meyer, J. S. (2006). Increased responsiveness to MDMA in adult rats treated neonatally with MDMA. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 28(1), pp. 95-102.
Piper BJ, Meyer JS. Increased Responsiveness to MDMA in Adult Rats Treated Neonatally With MDMA. Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2006;28(1):95-102. PubMed PMID: 16271852.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased responsiveness to MDMA in adult rats treated neonatally with MDMA. AU - Piper,Brian J, AU - Meyer,Jerrold S, Y1 - 2005/11/04/ PY - 2005/05/13/received PY - 2005/08/04/revised PY - 2005/09/16/accepted PY - 2005/11/8/pubmed PY - 2006/5/11/medline PY - 2005/11/8/entrez SP - 95 EP - 102 JF - Neurotoxicology and teratology JO - Neurotoxicol Teratol VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - MDMA [(+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as ecstasy] is a popular recreational drug among women of reproductive age. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term neurobehavioral consequences of early developmental MDMA exposure. On postnatal days (PD) 1-4, Sprague-Dawley rats received two 10 mg/kg injections of MDMA with an inter-dose interval of 4 h. Male subjects were tested in adulthood for their performance in an object-recognition memory task and for their thermal and behavioral responses to an acute MDMA challenge (10 mg/kg i.p.). Neonatal MDMA administration did not alter working memory in the object-recognition test in young adulthood (PD 68-73) and there were no differences in radiolabeled citalopram binding to the serotonin transporter at this age. However, the pretreated animals showed increased thermal dysregulation and serotonin syndrome responses (particularly headweaving stereotypy) following the MDMA challenge. These results add to the growing literature demonstrating that developmental MDMA administration can lead to long-lasting functional abnormalities, and they further suggest that the offspring of ecstasy-using women may be at risk for enhanced sensitivity to this drug due to their earlier exposure. SN - 0892-0362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16271852/Increased_responsiveness_to_MDMA_in_adult_rats_treated_neonatally_with_MDMA_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0892-0362(05)00131-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -