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Wrist arthrodesis.
Hand Clin. 2005 Nov; 21(4):631-40.HC

Abstract

Wrist arthrodesis results in a high degree of patient satisfaction and predictable pain relief in most patients. Most patients are able to return to gainful employment, many without impairment. Some patients require restrictions and employment in a less strenuous occupation. Successful fusion rates have been reported in the vast majority of patients overall. Although the functional outcome is acceptable for most patients,some adaptation is necessary, because certain activities such as perineal care and manipulating the hand in tight spaces are difficult. Activities that require forceful gripping with the hand ina fully pronated or supinated position also may be difficult to accomplish. Preoperative counseling of the patient should include a candid discussion of the potential postoperative functional difficulties. The most common indication for a wrist arthrodesis is advanced symptomatic arthritis secondary to a degenerative, post-traumatic, inflammatory, or postinfectious condition. Wrist arthrodesis also may improve function, hygiene,and cosmesis in the patient who has a contracted or flail wrist associated with cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, or brachial plexus injury.Various techniques have been described for achieving a successful arthrodesis. The type of operative technique used depends on the underlying condition, quality of bone, presence of bi-lateral disease, condition of the remaining joints of the involved extremity, and surgeon's preference. Intramedullary rod or Steinman pin fixation has been successful in patients who have inflammatory arthritis. Dorsal plate and screw fixation is preferred for patients who have post-traumatic or degenerative arthrosis. Rigid fixation with a dorsal plate is advocated because of the ease of implant application, the high rates of fusion achieved, and the avoidance of prolonged postoperative cast immobilization. Precontoured low profile plates have been developed to position the hand appropriately and to minimize extensor tendon irritation. Controversy still exists as to the ideal position of the hand. Generally the wrist is placed in slight dorsiflexion and ulnar deviation to optimize power grip. In cases of bilateral involvement, the nondominant hand may be placed in 5 degrees -10 degrees of flexion to better assist in such activities as perineal care. Complications are frequent but can be minimized with attention to detail and good surgical technique. Fortunately most complications are amenable to nonoperative treatment. Major complications include nonunion, deep wound infection, neuroma formation, DRUJ arthritis,ulnocarpal impaction, CTS, and painful retained hardware. Minor complications include hematoma formation, partial wound dehiscence, and transient paresthesias involving the radial, ulnar,or median nerves. Donor site morbidity remains a concern when the iliac crest is used. Complications include hematoma formation, infection, injury to the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve, and prolonged discomfort. Successful outcomes have been reported with the use of local autogenous cancellous bone graft from the distal radius metaphyseal region.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Elbow, Hand, and Microsurgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Health Systems, 2098 South Main Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48103, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16274872

Citation

Hayden, Radford J., and Peter J L. Jebson. "Wrist Arthrodesis." Hand Clinics, vol. 21, no. 4, 2005, pp. 631-40.
Hayden RJ, Jebson PJ. Wrist arthrodesis. Hand Clin. 2005;21(4):631-40.
Hayden, R. J., & Jebson, P. J. (2005). Wrist arthrodesis. Hand Clinics, 21(4), 631-40.
Hayden RJ, Jebson PJ. Wrist Arthrodesis. Hand Clin. 2005;21(4):631-40. PubMed PMID: 16274872.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Wrist arthrodesis. AU - Hayden,Radford J, AU - Jebson,Peter J L, PY - 2005/11/9/pubmed PY - 2006/3/1/medline PY - 2005/11/9/entrez SP - 631 EP - 40 JF - Hand clinics JO - Hand Clin VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - Wrist arthrodesis results in a high degree of patient satisfaction and predictable pain relief in most patients. Most patients are able to return to gainful employment, many without impairment. Some patients require restrictions and employment in a less strenuous occupation. Successful fusion rates have been reported in the vast majority of patients overall. Although the functional outcome is acceptable for most patients,some adaptation is necessary, because certain activities such as perineal care and manipulating the hand in tight spaces are difficult. Activities that require forceful gripping with the hand ina fully pronated or supinated position also may be difficult to accomplish. Preoperative counseling of the patient should include a candid discussion of the potential postoperative functional difficulties. The most common indication for a wrist arthrodesis is advanced symptomatic arthritis secondary to a degenerative, post-traumatic, inflammatory, or postinfectious condition. Wrist arthrodesis also may improve function, hygiene,and cosmesis in the patient who has a contracted or flail wrist associated with cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, or brachial plexus injury.Various techniques have been described for achieving a successful arthrodesis. The type of operative technique used depends on the underlying condition, quality of bone, presence of bi-lateral disease, condition of the remaining joints of the involved extremity, and surgeon's preference. Intramedullary rod or Steinman pin fixation has been successful in patients who have inflammatory arthritis. Dorsal plate and screw fixation is preferred for patients who have post-traumatic or degenerative arthrosis. Rigid fixation with a dorsal plate is advocated because of the ease of implant application, the high rates of fusion achieved, and the avoidance of prolonged postoperative cast immobilization. Precontoured low profile plates have been developed to position the hand appropriately and to minimize extensor tendon irritation. Controversy still exists as to the ideal position of the hand. Generally the wrist is placed in slight dorsiflexion and ulnar deviation to optimize power grip. In cases of bilateral involvement, the nondominant hand may be placed in 5 degrees -10 degrees of flexion to better assist in such activities as perineal care. Complications are frequent but can be minimized with attention to detail and good surgical technique. Fortunately most complications are amenable to nonoperative treatment. Major complications include nonunion, deep wound infection, neuroma formation, DRUJ arthritis,ulnocarpal impaction, CTS, and painful retained hardware. Minor complications include hematoma formation, partial wound dehiscence, and transient paresthesias involving the radial, ulnar,or median nerves. Donor site morbidity remains a concern when the iliac crest is used. Complications include hematoma formation, infection, injury to the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve, and prolonged discomfort. Successful outcomes have been reported with the use of local autogenous cancellous bone graft from the distal radius metaphyseal region. SN - 0749-0712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16274872/Wrist_arthrodesis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-0712(05)00078-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -