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Transmission of monkeypox among persons exposed to infected prairie dogs in Indiana in 2003.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005 Nov; 159(11):1022-5.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe a cluster of human monkeypox cases associated with exposure to ill prairie dogs in a home child care.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS

We identified all persons exposed to 2 pet prairie dogs in County A, Indiana; performed active surveillance for symptomatic monkeypox infection; and evaluated the types of exposure that may have resulted in infection. For children who attended the child care where the animals were housed, we also measured the rate of seroconversion to monkeypox virus.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Nine (13%) of 70 persons exposed to the prairie dogs reported signs and symptoms of monkeypox. Two (40%) of 5 symptomatic child care attendees reported direct contact with the prairie dogs. Two (13%) of 15 child care attendees evaluated tested positive for IgM antibodies against orthopoxvirus; both reported symptoms consistent with monkeypox.

RESULTS

The risk of symptomatic infection correlated with the time and intensity of animal exposure, which was 100% (4/4) among family members with extensive direct contact, 19% (5/26) among the veterinarian and nonfamily child care attendees with moderate exposure, and 0% (0/40) among school children with limited exposure (P<.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Monkeypox virus was transmitted from ill prairie dogs in a child care and veterinary facilities. The risk of symptomatic infection correlated with the amount of exposure to the prairie dogs. Although most cases of human monkeypox were associated with direct animal contact, other routes of transmission cannot be excluded.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environmental Health Services Branch, Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. james.kile@fsis.usda.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16275790

Citation

Kile, James C., et al. "Transmission of Monkeypox Among Persons Exposed to Infected Prairie Dogs in Indiana in 2003." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 159, no. 11, 2005, pp. 1022-5.
Kile JC, Fleischauer AT, Beard B, et al. Transmission of monkeypox among persons exposed to infected prairie dogs in Indiana in 2003. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159(11):1022-5.
Kile, J. C., Fleischauer, A. T., Beard, B., Kuehnert, M. J., Kanwal, R. S., Pontones, P., Messersmith, H. J., Teclaw, R., Karem, K. L., Braden, Z. H., Damon, I., Khan, A. S., & Fischer, M. (2005). Transmission of monkeypox among persons exposed to infected prairie dogs in Indiana in 2003. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 159(11), 1022-5.
Kile JC, et al. Transmission of Monkeypox Among Persons Exposed to Infected Prairie Dogs in Indiana in 2003. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159(11):1022-5. PubMed PMID: 16275790.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transmission of monkeypox among persons exposed to infected prairie dogs in Indiana in 2003. AU - Kile,James C, AU - Fleischauer,Aaron T, AU - Beard,Bradley, AU - Kuehnert,Matthew J, AU - Kanwal,Richard S, AU - Pontones,Pamela, AU - Messersmith,Hans J, AU - Teclaw,Robert, AU - Karem,Kevin L, AU - Braden,Zachary H, AU - Damon,Inger, AU - Khan,Ali S, AU - Fischer,Marc, PY - 2005/11/9/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/11/9/entrez SP - 1022 EP - 5 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 159 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe a cluster of human monkeypox cases associated with exposure to ill prairie dogs in a home child care. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: We identified all persons exposed to 2 pet prairie dogs in County A, Indiana; performed active surveillance for symptomatic monkeypox infection; and evaluated the types of exposure that may have resulted in infection. For children who attended the child care where the animals were housed, we also measured the rate of seroconversion to monkeypox virus. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Nine (13%) of 70 persons exposed to the prairie dogs reported signs and symptoms of monkeypox. Two (40%) of 5 symptomatic child care attendees reported direct contact with the prairie dogs. Two (13%) of 15 child care attendees evaluated tested positive for IgM antibodies against orthopoxvirus; both reported symptoms consistent with monkeypox. RESULTS: The risk of symptomatic infection correlated with the time and intensity of animal exposure, which was 100% (4/4) among family members with extensive direct contact, 19% (5/26) among the veterinarian and nonfamily child care attendees with moderate exposure, and 0% (0/40) among school children with limited exposure (P<.01). CONCLUSIONS: Monkeypox virus was transmitted from ill prairie dogs in a child care and veterinary facilities. The risk of symptomatic infection correlated with the amount of exposure to the prairie dogs. Although most cases of human monkeypox were associated with direct animal contact, other routes of transmission cannot be excluded. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16275790/Transmission_of_monkeypox_among_persons_exposed_to_infected_prairie_dogs_in_Indiana_in_2003_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpedi.159.11.1022 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -