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Bullying, psychosocial adjustment, and academic performance in elementary school.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2005; 159(11):1026-31AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Over the past decade, concerns about bullying and its role in school violence, depression, and health concerns have grown. However, no large studies in the United States have examined the prevalence of bullying during elementary school or its association with objective measures of school attendance and achievement.

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence of bullying during elementary school and its association with school attendance, academic achievement, disciplinary actions, and self-reported feelings of sadness, safety, and belonging.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study using 2001-2002 school data.

SETTING

Urban, West Coast public school district.

PARTICIPANTS

Three thousand five hundred thirty (91.4%) third, fourth, and fifth grade students.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Self-reported involvement in bullying.

RESULTS

Twenty-two percent of children surveyed were involved in bullying either as a victim, bully, or both. Victims and bully-victims were more likely to have low achievement than bystanders (odds ratios [ORs], 0.8 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7-0.9] and 0.8 [95% CI, 0.6-1.0], respectively). All 3 bullying-involved groups were significantly more likely than bystanders to feel unsafe at school (victims, OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 1.1-4.2]; bullies, OR, 2.5 [95% CI, 1.5-4.1]; bully-victims, OR, 5.0 [95% CI, 1.9-13.6]). Victims and bully-victims were more likely to report feeling that they don't belong at school (ORs, 4.1 [95% CI, 2.6-6.5] and 3.1 [95% CI, 1.3-7.2], respectively). Bullies and victims were more likely than bystanders to feel sad most days (ORs 1.5 [95% CI, 1.2-1.9] and 1.8 [95% CI, 1.2-2.8], respectively). Bullies and bully-victims were more likely to be male (ORs, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.2-1.9] and 3.0 [95% CI, 1.3-7.0], respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of frequent bullying among elementary school children is substantial. Associations between bullying involvement and school problems indicate this is a serious issue for elementary schools. The research presented herein demonstrates the need for evidence-based antibullying curricula in the elementary grades.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. gwenglew@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16275791

Citation

Glew, Gwen M., et al. "Bullying, Psychosocial Adjustment, and Academic Performance in Elementary School." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 159, no. 11, 2005, pp. 1026-31.
Glew GM, Fan MY, Katon W, et al. Bullying, psychosocial adjustment, and academic performance in elementary school. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159(11):1026-31.
Glew, G. M., Fan, M. Y., Katon, W., Rivara, F. P., & Kernic, M. A. (2005). Bullying, psychosocial adjustment, and academic performance in elementary school. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 159(11), pp. 1026-31.
Glew GM, et al. Bullying, Psychosocial Adjustment, and Academic Performance in Elementary School. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159(11):1026-31. PubMed PMID: 16275791.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bullying, psychosocial adjustment, and academic performance in elementary school. AU - Glew,Gwen M, AU - Fan,Ming-Yu, AU - Katon,Wayne, AU - Rivara,Frederick P, AU - Kernic,Mary A, PY - 2005/11/9/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/11/9/entrez SP - 1026 EP - 31 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 159 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, concerns about bullying and its role in school violence, depression, and health concerns have grown. However, no large studies in the United States have examined the prevalence of bullying during elementary school or its association with objective measures of school attendance and achievement. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bullying during elementary school and its association with school attendance, academic achievement, disciplinary actions, and self-reported feelings of sadness, safety, and belonging. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study using 2001-2002 school data. SETTING: Urban, West Coast public school district. PARTICIPANTS: Three thousand five hundred thirty (91.4%) third, fourth, and fifth grade students. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Self-reported involvement in bullying. RESULTS: Twenty-two percent of children surveyed were involved in bullying either as a victim, bully, or both. Victims and bully-victims were more likely to have low achievement than bystanders (odds ratios [ORs], 0.8 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7-0.9] and 0.8 [95% CI, 0.6-1.0], respectively). All 3 bullying-involved groups were significantly more likely than bystanders to feel unsafe at school (victims, OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 1.1-4.2]; bullies, OR, 2.5 [95% CI, 1.5-4.1]; bully-victims, OR, 5.0 [95% CI, 1.9-13.6]). Victims and bully-victims were more likely to report feeling that they don't belong at school (ORs, 4.1 [95% CI, 2.6-6.5] and 3.1 [95% CI, 1.3-7.2], respectively). Bullies and victims were more likely than bystanders to feel sad most days (ORs 1.5 [95% CI, 1.2-1.9] and 1.8 [95% CI, 1.2-2.8], respectively). Bullies and bully-victims were more likely to be male (ORs, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.2-1.9] and 3.0 [95% CI, 1.3-7.0], respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of frequent bullying among elementary school children is substantial. Associations between bullying involvement and school problems indicate this is a serious issue for elementary schools. The research presented herein demonstrates the need for evidence-based antibullying curricula in the elementary grades. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16275791/Bullying_psychosocial_adjustment_and_academic_performance_in_elementary_school_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpedi.159.11.1026 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -