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Statins and cognitive function in the elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study.
Neurology 2005; 65(9):1388-94Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association of statin drug use on cognitive and MRI change in older adults.

METHODS

Participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a longitudinal study of people age 65 or older, were classified into three groups determined by whether they were taking statin drugs on a continuous basis, intermittently, or not at all. The untreated group was further divided into categories based on National Cholesterol Education Program recommendations for lipid-lowering treatment. Participants with prevalent or incident clinical TIA or stroke or with baseline Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS) scores at or below 80 were excluded. Outcomes examined included rate of change on the 3MS over an average observational period of 7 years, along with changes in MRI white matter grade and measures of atrophy.

RESULTS

Three thousand three hundred thirty-four participants had adequate data for analysis. At baseline, the untreated group in which lipid-lowering drug treatment was recommended were slightly older, less likely to be on estrogen replacement, and had higher serum cholesterol and lower 3MS scores than the statin-treated group. The rate of decline on the 3MS was 0.48 point/year less in those taking statins compared with the untreated group for which treatment was recommended (p = 0.069) and 0.49 point/year less in statin users compared with the group in which lipid-lowering treatment was not recommended (p = 0.009). This effect remained after controlling for serum cholesterol levels. One thousand seven hundred thirty participants with baseline 3MS scores of > 80 underwent cranial MRI scans on two occasions separated by 5 years. There was no significant difference in white matter grade change or atrophy measures between groups.

CONCLUSION

Statin drug use was associated with a slight reduction in cognitive decline in an elderly population. This relationship could not be completely explained by the effect of statins on lowering of serum cholesterol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV 89102, USA. cbernick@med.unr.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16275825

Citation

Bernick, C, et al. "Statins and Cognitive Function in the Elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study." Neurology, vol. 65, no. 9, 2005, pp. 1388-94.
Bernick C, Katz R, Smith NL, et al. Statins and cognitive function in the elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study. Neurology. 2005;65(9):1388-94.
Bernick, C., Katz, R., Smith, N. L., Rapp, S., Bhadelia, R., Carlson, M., & Kuller, L. (2005). Statins and cognitive function in the elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study. Neurology, 65(9), pp. 1388-94.
Bernick C, et al. Statins and Cognitive Function in the Elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study. Neurology. 2005 Nov 8;65(9):1388-94. PubMed PMID: 16275825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Statins and cognitive function in the elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study. AU - Bernick,C, AU - Katz,R, AU - Smith,N L, AU - Rapp,S, AU - Bhadelia,R, AU - Carlson,M, AU - Kuller,L, AU - ,, PY - 2005/11/9/pubmed PY - 2006/4/13/medline PY - 2005/11/9/entrez SP - 1388 EP - 94 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 65 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of statin drug use on cognitive and MRI change in older adults. METHODS: Participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a longitudinal study of people age 65 or older, were classified into three groups determined by whether they were taking statin drugs on a continuous basis, intermittently, or not at all. The untreated group was further divided into categories based on National Cholesterol Education Program recommendations for lipid-lowering treatment. Participants with prevalent or incident clinical TIA or stroke or with baseline Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS) scores at or below 80 were excluded. Outcomes examined included rate of change on the 3MS over an average observational period of 7 years, along with changes in MRI white matter grade and measures of atrophy. RESULTS: Three thousand three hundred thirty-four participants had adequate data for analysis. At baseline, the untreated group in which lipid-lowering drug treatment was recommended were slightly older, less likely to be on estrogen replacement, and had higher serum cholesterol and lower 3MS scores than the statin-treated group. The rate of decline on the 3MS was 0.48 point/year less in those taking statins compared with the untreated group for which treatment was recommended (p = 0.069) and 0.49 point/year less in statin users compared with the group in which lipid-lowering treatment was not recommended (p = 0.009). This effect remained after controlling for serum cholesterol levels. One thousand seven hundred thirty participants with baseline 3MS scores of > 80 underwent cranial MRI scans on two occasions separated by 5 years. There was no significant difference in white matter grade change or atrophy measures between groups. CONCLUSION: Statin drug use was associated with a slight reduction in cognitive decline in an elderly population. This relationship could not be completely explained by the effect of statins on lowering of serum cholesterol. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16275825/Statins_and_cognitive_function_in_the_elderly:_the_Cardiovascular_Health_Study_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16275825 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -