Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Visual dysfunction in Parkinson disease without dementia.
Neurology. 2005 Dec 27; 65(12):1907-13.Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the profiles of visual dysfunction and their relationship to motor and cognitive dysfunction and to disability in mild to moderate Parkinson disease (PD) without dementia.

METHODS

Seventy-six independently living participants with mild to moderate PD and 161 neurologically normal older adults were studied using a comprehensive battery to assess visual acuity, contrast sensitivity (CS), visual speed of processing and attention, spatial and motion perception, visual and verbal memory, visuoconstructional abilities, executive functions, depression, and motor function.

RESULTS

Participants with PD scored significantly worse on all tests of vision and cognition compared with normal elderly persons. Reduced CS contributed to deficits on tests of spatial and motion perception and attention in participants with PD. Impairments in visual attention and spatial perception predicted worse cognitive function. Worse performances on tests of visual speed of processing and attention, spatial and motion perception, visual construction, and executive functions correlated with measures of postural instability and gait difficulty (in the Motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale). Impairments in motor function, visual memory, mood, and executive functions predicted worse disability as measured by Schwab-England Activities of Daily Living Scale.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with mild to moderate Parkinson disease showed impaired visual perception and cognition compared with elderly control subjects. Visual dysfunction contributes to parkinsonian disability through its influences on cognition and locomotion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. ergun-uc@uiowa.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16282276

Citation

Uc, E Y., et al. "Visual Dysfunction in Parkinson Disease Without Dementia." Neurology, vol. 65, no. 12, 2005, pp. 1907-13.
Uc EY, Rizzo M, Anderson SW, et al. Visual dysfunction in Parkinson disease without dementia. Neurology. 2005;65(12):1907-13.
Uc, E. Y., Rizzo, M., Anderson, S. W., Qian, S., Rodnitzky, R. L., & Dawson, J. D. (2005). Visual dysfunction in Parkinson disease without dementia. Neurology, 65(12), 1907-13.
Uc EY, et al. Visual Dysfunction in Parkinson Disease Without Dementia. Neurology. 2005 Dec 27;65(12):1907-13. PubMed PMID: 16282276.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Visual dysfunction in Parkinson disease without dementia. AU - Uc,E Y, AU - Rizzo,M, AU - Anderson,S W, AU - Qian,S, AU - Rodnitzky,R L, AU - Dawson,J D, Y1 - 2005/11/09/ PY - 2005/11/12/pubmed PY - 2006/4/15/medline PY - 2005/11/12/entrez SP - 1907 EP - 13 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 65 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the profiles of visual dysfunction and their relationship to motor and cognitive dysfunction and to disability in mild to moderate Parkinson disease (PD) without dementia. METHODS: Seventy-six independently living participants with mild to moderate PD and 161 neurologically normal older adults were studied using a comprehensive battery to assess visual acuity, contrast sensitivity (CS), visual speed of processing and attention, spatial and motion perception, visual and verbal memory, visuoconstructional abilities, executive functions, depression, and motor function. RESULTS: Participants with PD scored significantly worse on all tests of vision and cognition compared with normal elderly persons. Reduced CS contributed to deficits on tests of spatial and motion perception and attention in participants with PD. Impairments in visual attention and spatial perception predicted worse cognitive function. Worse performances on tests of visual speed of processing and attention, spatial and motion perception, visual construction, and executive functions correlated with measures of postural instability and gait difficulty (in the Motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale). Impairments in motor function, visual memory, mood, and executive functions predicted worse disability as measured by Schwab-England Activities of Daily Living Scale. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with mild to moderate Parkinson disease showed impaired visual perception and cognition compared with elderly control subjects. Visual dysfunction contributes to parkinsonian disability through its influences on cognition and locomotion. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16282276/Visual_dysfunction_in_Parkinson_disease_without_dementia_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16282276 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -