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Cephalometric norms of Nigerian children.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2005 Nov; 128(5):653-6.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this study was to develop cephalometric standards for Nigerian children.

METHODS

The average values of 7 dentoskeletal angles were determined from standardized lateral head radiographs of 100 schoolchildren (aged 11 to 13 years; mean, 12.6 years) in Enugu, a city in southeastern Nigeria. The children, born to Nigerian parents of Igbo ancestry (Igbo is 1 of the 3 major ethnic groups in Nigeria), were selected on the basis of a well-balanced face and acceptable profile, Class I occlusion with normal overjet and overbite, minor or no crowding or spacing, and no history of orthodontic treatment.

RESULTS

There were no statistically significant differences in cephalometric measurements between boys and girls; thus, the data were combined for analysis. The mean values and standard deviations obtained for the measured variables were: SNA, 85.5 degrees (+/- 4.3 degrees); SNB, 81.2 degrees (+/- 4.0 degrees); ANB, 4.3 degrees (+/- 2.5 degrees); UI-FP, 122.8 degrees (+/- 7.5 degrees); Ll-MP, 98.8 degrees (+/- 5.8 degrees); Ul-LI, 109.1 degrees (+/- 8.0 degrees); and FMA, 26.1 degrees (+/- 5.0 degrees).

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with the norms for other ethnic groups, Igbo children have a prognathic relationship of the maxilla and the mandible to the anterior cranial base with a tendency toward a protrusive skeletal pattern. The children also exhibited prominent bimaxillary proclination with procumbent and protrusive maxillary and mandibular incisors and a steep Frankfort-mandibular plane angle. The findings emphasize the need for group-specific norms for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, and provide cephalometric standards for Igbo children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Orthodontic Unit, Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. buskyet@yahoo.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16286214

Citation

Ajayi, Emmanuel Olubusayo. "Cephalometric Norms of Nigerian Children." American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, vol. 128, no. 5, 2005, pp. 653-6.
Ajayi EO. Cephalometric norms of Nigerian children. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2005;128(5):653-6.
Ajayi, E. O. (2005). Cephalometric norms of Nigerian children. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, 128(5), 653-6.
Ajayi EO. Cephalometric Norms of Nigerian Children. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2005;128(5):653-6. PubMed PMID: 16286214.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cephalometric norms of Nigerian children. A1 - Ajayi,Emmanuel Olubusayo, PY - 2005/02/01/received PY - 2005/05/01/revised PY - 2005/05/01/accepted PY - 2005/11/16/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/11/16/entrez SP - 653 EP - 6 JF - American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics JO - Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop VL - 128 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to develop cephalometric standards for Nigerian children. METHODS: The average values of 7 dentoskeletal angles were determined from standardized lateral head radiographs of 100 schoolchildren (aged 11 to 13 years; mean, 12.6 years) in Enugu, a city in southeastern Nigeria. The children, born to Nigerian parents of Igbo ancestry (Igbo is 1 of the 3 major ethnic groups in Nigeria), were selected on the basis of a well-balanced face and acceptable profile, Class I occlusion with normal overjet and overbite, minor or no crowding or spacing, and no history of orthodontic treatment. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in cephalometric measurements between boys and girls; thus, the data were combined for analysis. The mean values and standard deviations obtained for the measured variables were: SNA, 85.5 degrees (+/- 4.3 degrees); SNB, 81.2 degrees (+/- 4.0 degrees); ANB, 4.3 degrees (+/- 2.5 degrees); UI-FP, 122.8 degrees (+/- 7.5 degrees); Ll-MP, 98.8 degrees (+/- 5.8 degrees); Ul-LI, 109.1 degrees (+/- 8.0 degrees); and FMA, 26.1 degrees (+/- 5.0 degrees). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the norms for other ethnic groups, Igbo children have a prognathic relationship of the maxilla and the mandible to the anterior cranial base with a tendency toward a protrusive skeletal pattern. The children also exhibited prominent bimaxillary proclination with procumbent and protrusive maxillary and mandibular incisors and a steep Frankfort-mandibular plane angle. The findings emphasize the need for group-specific norms for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, and provide cephalometric standards for Igbo children. SN - 0889-5406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16286214/Cephalometric_norms_of_Nigerian_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-5406(05)00740-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -