Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Altered hypothalamic signaling and responses to food deprivation in rats fed a low-carbohydrate diet.
Obes Res. 2005 Oct; 13(10):1672-82.OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To model how consuming a low-carbohydrate (LC) diet influences food intake and body weight.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Food intake and body weight were monitored in rats with access to chow (CH), LC-high-fat (HF), or HF diets. After 8 weeks, rats received intracerebroventricular injections of a melanocortin agonist (melanotan-II) and antagonist (SHU9119), and feeding responses were measured. At sacrifice, plasma hormones and hypothalamic expression of mRNA for proopiomelanocortin (POMC), melanocortin-4 receptor, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and agouti related protein (AgRP) were assessed. A second set of rats had access to diet (chow or LC-HF) for 4 weeks followed by 24 h food deprivation on two occasions, after which food intake and hypothalamic POMC, NPY, and AgRP mRNA expression were measured.

RESULTS

HF rats consumed more food and gained more weight than rats on CH or LC-HF diets. Despite similar intakes and weight gains, LC-HF rats had increased adiposity relative to CH rats. LC-HF rats were more sensitive to melanotan-II and less sensitive to SHU9119. LC-HF rats had increased plasma leptin and ghrelin levels and decreased insulin levels, and patterns of NPY and POMC mRNA expression were consistent with those of food-deprived rats. LC-HF rats did not show rebound hyperphagia after food deprivation, and levels NPY, POMC, and AgRP mRNA expression were not affected by deprivation.

DISCUSSION

Our results demonstrate that an LC diet influences multiple systems involved in the controls of food intake and body weight. These data also suggest that maintenance on an LC-HF diet affects food intake by reducing compensatory responses to food deprivation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. kkinzig@psych.purdue.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16286514

Citation

Kinzig, Kimberly P., et al. "Altered Hypothalamic Signaling and Responses to Food Deprivation in Rats Fed a Low-carbohydrate Diet." Obesity Research, vol. 13, no. 10, 2005, pp. 1672-82.
Kinzig KP, Scott KA, Hyun J, et al. Altered hypothalamic signaling and responses to food deprivation in rats fed a low-carbohydrate diet. Obes Res. 2005;13(10):1672-82.
Kinzig, K. P., Scott, K. A., Hyun, J., Bi, S., & Moran, T. H. (2005). Altered hypothalamic signaling and responses to food deprivation in rats fed a low-carbohydrate diet. Obesity Research, 13(10), 1672-82.
Kinzig KP, et al. Altered Hypothalamic Signaling and Responses to Food Deprivation in Rats Fed a Low-carbohydrate Diet. Obes Res. 2005;13(10):1672-82. PubMed PMID: 16286514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Altered hypothalamic signaling and responses to food deprivation in rats fed a low-carbohydrate diet. AU - Kinzig,Kimberly P, AU - Scott,Karen A, AU - Hyun,Jayson, AU - Bi,Sheng, AU - Moran,Timothy H, PY - 2005/11/16/pubmed PY - 2006/1/25/medline PY - 2005/11/16/entrez SP - 1672 EP - 82 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes. Res. VL - 13 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To model how consuming a low-carbohydrate (LC) diet influences food intake and body weight. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Food intake and body weight were monitored in rats with access to chow (CH), LC-high-fat (HF), or HF diets. After 8 weeks, rats received intracerebroventricular injections of a melanocortin agonist (melanotan-II) and antagonist (SHU9119), and feeding responses were measured. At sacrifice, plasma hormones and hypothalamic expression of mRNA for proopiomelanocortin (POMC), melanocortin-4 receptor, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and agouti related protein (AgRP) were assessed. A second set of rats had access to diet (chow or LC-HF) for 4 weeks followed by 24 h food deprivation on two occasions, after which food intake and hypothalamic POMC, NPY, and AgRP mRNA expression were measured. RESULTS: HF rats consumed more food and gained more weight than rats on CH or LC-HF diets. Despite similar intakes and weight gains, LC-HF rats had increased adiposity relative to CH rats. LC-HF rats were more sensitive to melanotan-II and less sensitive to SHU9119. LC-HF rats had increased plasma leptin and ghrelin levels and decreased insulin levels, and patterns of NPY and POMC mRNA expression were consistent with those of food-deprived rats. LC-HF rats did not show rebound hyperphagia after food deprivation, and levels NPY, POMC, and AgRP mRNA expression were not affected by deprivation. DISCUSSION: Our results demonstrate that an LC diet influences multiple systems involved in the controls of food intake and body weight. These data also suggest that maintenance on an LC-HF diet affects food intake by reducing compensatory responses to food deprivation. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16286514/Altered_hypothalamic_signaling_and_responses_to_food_deprivation_in_rats_fed_a_low_carbohydrate_diet_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2005.205 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -