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Diabetes mellitus and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2005; 97(22):1679-87JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diabetes has been associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in most, but not all, studies. Findings have also been inconclusive with regard to sex and subsite in the colorectum. To resolve these inconsistencies, we conducted a meta-analysis of published data on the association between diabetes and the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer.

METHODS

We identified studies by a literature search of Medline from January 1, 1966, through July 31, 2005, and by searching the reference lists of pertinent articles. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS

Analysis of 15 studies (six case-control and nine cohort studies), including 2 593 935 participants, found that diabetes was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, compared with no diabetes (summary RR of colorectal cancer incidence = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.20 to 1.40), without heterogeneity between studies (P(heterogeneity) = .21). These results were consistent between case-control and cohort studies and between studies conducted in the United States and in Europe. The association between diabetes and colorectal cancer incidence did not differ statistically significantly by sex (summary RR among women = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.23 to 1.44; summary RR among men = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.44; P(heterogeneity) = .26) or by cancer subsite (summary RR for colon = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.60; summary RR for rectum = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.54; P(heterogeneity) = .42). Diabetes was positively associated with colorectal cancer mortality (summary RR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.50), but there was evidence for heterogeneity between studies (P(heterogeneity) = .04).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings strongly support a relationship between diabetes and increased risk of colon and rectal cancer in both women and men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden . susanna.larsson@ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16288121

Citation

Larsson, Susanna C., et al. "Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 97, no. 22, 2005, pp. 1679-87.
Larsson SC, Orsini N, Wolk A. Diabetes mellitus and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005;97(22):1679-87.
Larsson, S. C., Orsini, N., & Wolk, A. (2005). Diabetes mellitus and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 97(22), pp. 1679-87.
Larsson SC, Orsini N, Wolk A. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 16;97(22):1679-87. PubMed PMID: 16288121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diabetes mellitus and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis. AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Orsini,Nicola, AU - Wolk,Alicja, PY - 2005/11/17/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/11/17/entrez SP - 1679 EP - 87 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 97 IS - 22 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diabetes has been associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in most, but not all, studies. Findings have also been inconclusive with regard to sex and subsite in the colorectum. To resolve these inconsistencies, we conducted a meta-analysis of published data on the association between diabetes and the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer. METHODS: We identified studies by a literature search of Medline from January 1, 1966, through July 31, 2005, and by searching the reference lists of pertinent articles. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Analysis of 15 studies (six case-control and nine cohort studies), including 2 593 935 participants, found that diabetes was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, compared with no diabetes (summary RR of colorectal cancer incidence = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.20 to 1.40), without heterogeneity between studies (P(heterogeneity) = .21). These results were consistent between case-control and cohort studies and between studies conducted in the United States and in Europe. The association between diabetes and colorectal cancer incidence did not differ statistically significantly by sex (summary RR among women = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.23 to 1.44; summary RR among men = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.44; P(heterogeneity) = .26) or by cancer subsite (summary RR for colon = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.60; summary RR for rectum = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.54; P(heterogeneity) = .42). Diabetes was positively associated with colorectal cancer mortality (summary RR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.50), but there was evidence for heterogeneity between studies (P(heterogeneity) = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings strongly support a relationship between diabetes and increased risk of colon and rectal cancer in both women and men. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16288121/Diabetes_mellitus_and_risk_of_colorectal_cancer:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/dji375 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -