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Chronic multisymptom illness complex in Gulf War I veterans 10 years later.
Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jan 01; 163(1):66-75.AJ

Abstract

Prior research has demonstrated that shortly after the 1991 Gulf War (Gulf War I), chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) was more common among deployed veterans than among nondeployed veterans. The aims of the current study were to determine the prevalence of CMI among deployed and nondeployed veterans 10 years after Gulf War I, compare the distribution of comorbid conditions, and identify prewar factors associated with CMI. Cross-sectional data collected from 1,061 deployed veterans and 1,128 nondeployed veterans examined between 1999 and 2001 were analyzed. CMI prevalence was 28.9% among deployed veterans and 15.8% among nondeployed veterans (odds ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.61, 2.90). Deployed and nondeployed veterans with CMI had similarly poorer quality-of-life measures and higher prevalences of symptom-based medical conditions, metabolic syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. Diagnoses of prewar anxiety disorders (not related to post-traumatic stress disorder) and depression were associated with CMI among both deployed and nondeployed veterans. Nicotine dependence and veteran-reported physician-diagnosed infectious mononucleosis were associated with CMI among deployed veterans, and migraine headaches and gastritis were associated with CMI among nondeployed veterans. CMI continues to be substantially more prevalent among deployed veterans than among nondeployed veterans 10 years after Gulf War I, but it manifests similarly in both groups. It is likely to be a common, persistent problem among veterans returning from the current Gulf War.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical and Research Services, St. Louis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, St. Louis, MO 63106, USA. melvin.blanchard@med.va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16293719

Citation

Blanchard, Melvin S., et al. "Chronic Multisymptom Illness Complex in Gulf War I Veterans 10 Years Later." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 163, no. 1, 2006, pp. 66-75.
Blanchard MS, Eisen SA, Alpern R, et al. Chronic multisymptom illness complex in Gulf War I veterans 10 years later. Am J Epidemiol. 2006;163(1):66-75.
Blanchard, M. S., Eisen, S. A., Alpern, R., Karlinsky, J., Toomey, R., Reda, D. J., Murphy, F. M., Jackson, L. W., & Kang, H. K. (2006). Chronic multisymptom illness complex in Gulf War I veterans 10 years later. American Journal of Epidemiology, 163(1), 66-75.
Blanchard MS, et al. Chronic Multisymptom Illness Complex in Gulf War I Veterans 10 Years Later. Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jan 1;163(1):66-75. PubMed PMID: 16293719.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chronic multisymptom illness complex in Gulf War I veterans 10 years later. AU - Blanchard,Melvin S, AU - Eisen,Seth A, AU - Alpern,Renee, AU - Karlinsky,Joel, AU - Toomey,Rosemary, AU - Reda,Domenic J, AU - Murphy,Frances M, AU - Jackson,Leila W, AU - Kang,Han K, Y1 - 2005/11/17/ PY - 2005/11/19/pubmed PY - 2006/2/17/medline PY - 2005/11/19/entrez SP - 66 EP - 75 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am J Epidemiol VL - 163 IS - 1 N2 - Prior research has demonstrated that shortly after the 1991 Gulf War (Gulf War I), chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) was more common among deployed veterans than among nondeployed veterans. The aims of the current study were to determine the prevalence of CMI among deployed and nondeployed veterans 10 years after Gulf War I, compare the distribution of comorbid conditions, and identify prewar factors associated with CMI. Cross-sectional data collected from 1,061 deployed veterans and 1,128 nondeployed veterans examined between 1999 and 2001 were analyzed. CMI prevalence was 28.9% among deployed veterans and 15.8% among nondeployed veterans (odds ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.61, 2.90). Deployed and nondeployed veterans with CMI had similarly poorer quality-of-life measures and higher prevalences of symptom-based medical conditions, metabolic syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. Diagnoses of prewar anxiety disorders (not related to post-traumatic stress disorder) and depression were associated with CMI among both deployed and nondeployed veterans. Nicotine dependence and veteran-reported physician-diagnosed infectious mononucleosis were associated with CMI among deployed veterans, and migraine headaches and gastritis were associated with CMI among nondeployed veterans. CMI continues to be substantially more prevalent among deployed veterans than among nondeployed veterans 10 years after Gulf War I, but it manifests similarly in both groups. It is likely to be a common, persistent problem among veterans returning from the current Gulf War. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16293719/Chronic_multisymptom_illness_complex_in_Gulf_War_I_veterans_10_years_later_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwj008 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -