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The indoor UV tanning industry: a review of skin cancer risk, health benefit claims, and regulation.
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Dec; 53(6):1038-44.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nearly 30 million people tan indoors in the United States annually, including 2.3 million adolescents. Despite increased evidence on the dangers of artificial UV radiation, the popularity of indoor tanning is growing.

OBJECTIVES

We aim to assess the following 3 entities: (1) the association of indoor tanning with skin cancer; (2) statements regarding the health benefits of indoor tanning, especially regarding the production of vitamin D; and (3) current regulation of the tanning industry in the United States.

METHODS

We conducted a narrative review of the literature.

RESULTS

Indoor tanning poses great risks. Studies support the role of artificial UV radiation in cutaneous carcinogenesis. Despite claims by the tanning industry, artificial tanning is not a safe or necessary way to increase systemic vitamin D levels. The National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization have acknowledged the risks of indoor tanning. Nonetheless, regulations limiting tanning in the United States are surprisingly sparse.

LIMITATIONS

Systematic review of the literature was not performed.

CONCLUSIONS

Health care providers must increase efforts to warn and educate the public and government about the dangers of UV radiation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, State University New York Downstate Medical Center, New York 11203, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16310065

Citation

Levine, Jody A., et al. "The Indoor UV Tanning Industry: a Review of Skin Cancer Risk, Health Benefit Claims, and Regulation." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 53, no. 6, 2005, pp. 1038-44.
Levine JA, Sorace M, Spencer J, et al. The indoor UV tanning industry: a review of skin cancer risk, health benefit claims, and regulation. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005;53(6):1038-44.
Levine, J. A., Sorace, M., Spencer, J., & Siegel, D. M. (2005). The indoor UV tanning industry: a review of skin cancer risk, health benefit claims, and regulation. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 53(6), 1038-44.
Levine JA, et al. The Indoor UV Tanning Industry: a Review of Skin Cancer Risk, Health Benefit Claims, and Regulation. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005;53(6):1038-44. PubMed PMID: 16310065.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The indoor UV tanning industry: a review of skin cancer risk, health benefit claims, and regulation. AU - Levine,Jody A, AU - Sorace,Michael, AU - Spencer,James, AU - Siegel,Daniel M, PY - 2005/03/18/received PY - 2005/07/19/revised PY - 2005/07/29/accepted PY - 2005/11/29/pubmed PY - 2006/5/16/medline PY - 2005/11/29/entrez SP - 1038 EP - 44 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. VL - 53 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nearly 30 million people tan indoors in the United States annually, including 2.3 million adolescents. Despite increased evidence on the dangers of artificial UV radiation, the popularity of indoor tanning is growing. OBJECTIVES: We aim to assess the following 3 entities: (1) the association of indoor tanning with skin cancer; (2) statements regarding the health benefits of indoor tanning, especially regarding the production of vitamin D; and (3) current regulation of the tanning industry in the United States. METHODS: We conducted a narrative review of the literature. RESULTS: Indoor tanning poses great risks. Studies support the role of artificial UV radiation in cutaneous carcinogenesis. Despite claims by the tanning industry, artificial tanning is not a safe or necessary way to increase systemic vitamin D levels. The National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization have acknowledged the risks of indoor tanning. Nonetheless, regulations limiting tanning in the United States are surprisingly sparse. LIMITATIONS: Systematic review of the literature was not performed. CONCLUSIONS: Health care providers must increase efforts to warn and educate the public and government about the dangers of UV radiation. SN - 1097-6787 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16310065/The_indoor_UV_tanning_industry:_a_review_of_skin_cancer_risk_health_benefit_claims_and_regulation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190-9622(05)02581-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -