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Effect of GB virus C on response to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Brazilians.
HIV Med. 2006 Jan; 7(1):25-31.HM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

GB virus C (GBV-C) infection is associated with delayed mortality in HIV-infected people in most, but not all, studies. Previous investigations of the effect of GBV-C viraemia on response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) were inconclusive. To determine the effect of GBV-C on ART, we retrospectively analysed plasma samples taken from patients in a prospective randomized clinical trial of ART in HIV-positive Brazilians.

METHODS

GBV-C viraemia was characterized by testing stored serum samples from 175 participants by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Subjects were randomized to receive indinavir (n=59), zidovudine and lamivudine (n=58), or zidovudine, lamivudine and indinavir (n=58). The effect of GBV-C viraemia on the average change in HIV viral load and CD4 count following initiation of therapy was evaluated in a multiple regression analysis.

RESULTS

The prevalence of GBV-C viraemia was similar to that observed in previous studies (24%). HIV viral load decreased following ART to a significantly greater extent in patients with GBV-C viraemia (by 0.48 log(10) HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, P=0.009, adjusting for age, ART group, and baseline CD4 count). Although there was no significant difference in change in CD4 count between individuals with and without GBV-C viraemia overall, CD4 counts were higher following 48 weeks of therapy in GBV-C viraemic individuals receiving the least potent ART regimen (zidovudine and lamivudine) compared with those without GBV-C infection.

CONCLUSIONS

GBV-C viraemia is associated with an enhanced reduction of HIV viral load in response to ART. In this study of treatment-naive individuals during 48 weeks of follow up, patients with GBV-C viraemia had reductions in HIV viral load that were approximately 0.5 log copies/mL greater than those found in patients without GBV-C viraemia. This is similar to reductions observed with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Roy, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16313289

Citation

Souza, I E., et al. "Effect of GB Virus C On Response to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-infected Brazilians." HIV Medicine, vol. 7, no. 1, 2006, pp. 25-31.
Souza IE, Zhang W, Diaz RS, et al. Effect of GB virus C on response to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Brazilians. HIV Med. 2006;7(1):25-31.
Souza, I. E., Zhang, W., Diaz, R. S., Chaloner, K., Klinzman, D., & Stapleton, J. T. (2006). Effect of GB virus C on response to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Brazilians. HIV Medicine, 7(1), 25-31.
Souza IE, et al. Effect of GB Virus C On Response to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-infected Brazilians. HIV Med. 2006;7(1):25-31. PubMed PMID: 16313289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of GB virus C on response to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Brazilians. AU - Souza,I E, AU - Zhang,W, AU - Diaz,R S, AU - Chaloner,K, AU - Klinzman,D, AU - Stapleton,J T, PY - 2005/11/30/pubmed PY - 2006/8/17/medline PY - 2005/11/30/entrez SP - 25 EP - 31 JF - HIV medicine JO - HIV Med VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: GB virus C (GBV-C) infection is associated with delayed mortality in HIV-infected people in most, but not all, studies. Previous investigations of the effect of GBV-C viraemia on response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) were inconclusive. To determine the effect of GBV-C on ART, we retrospectively analysed plasma samples taken from patients in a prospective randomized clinical trial of ART in HIV-positive Brazilians. METHODS: GBV-C viraemia was characterized by testing stored serum samples from 175 participants by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Subjects were randomized to receive indinavir (n=59), zidovudine and lamivudine (n=58), or zidovudine, lamivudine and indinavir (n=58). The effect of GBV-C viraemia on the average change in HIV viral load and CD4 count following initiation of therapy was evaluated in a multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of GBV-C viraemia was similar to that observed in previous studies (24%). HIV viral load decreased following ART to a significantly greater extent in patients with GBV-C viraemia (by 0.48 log(10) HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, P=0.009, adjusting for age, ART group, and baseline CD4 count). Although there was no significant difference in change in CD4 count between individuals with and without GBV-C viraemia overall, CD4 counts were higher following 48 weeks of therapy in GBV-C viraemic individuals receiving the least potent ART regimen (zidovudine and lamivudine) compared with those without GBV-C infection. CONCLUSIONS: GBV-C viraemia is associated with an enhanced reduction of HIV viral load in response to ART. In this study of treatment-naive individuals during 48 weeks of follow up, patients with GBV-C viraemia had reductions in HIV viral load that were approximately 0.5 log copies/mL greater than those found in patients without GBV-C viraemia. This is similar to reductions observed with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. SN - 1464-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16313289/Effect_of_GB_virus_C_on_response_to_antiretroviral_therapy_in_HIV_infected_Brazilians_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -