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Social support and coronary heart disease: epidemiologic evidence and implications for treatment.
Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec; 67(6):869-78.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The present paper reviews theories of social support and evidence for the role of social support in the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD).

METHODS

Articles for the primary review of social support as a risk factor were identified with MEDLINE (1966-2004) and PsychINFO (1872-2004). Reviews of bibliographies also were used to identify relevant articles.

RESULTS

In general, evidence suggests that low social support confers a risk of 1.5 to 2.0 in both healthy populations and in patients with established CHD. However, there is substantial variability in the manner in which social support is conceptualized and measured. In addition, few studies have simultaneously compared differing types of support.

CONCLUSIONS

Although low levels of support are associated with increased risk for CHD events, it is not clear what types of support are most associated with clinical outcomes in healthy persons and CHD patients. The development of a consensus in the conceptualization and measurement of social support is needed to examine which types of support are most likely to be associated with adverse CHD outcomes. There also is little evidence that improving low social support reduces CHD events.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. heather.lett@alumni.duke.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16314591

Citation

Lett, Heather S., et al. "Social Support and Coronary Heart Disease: Epidemiologic Evidence and Implications for Treatment." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 67, no. 6, 2005, pp. 869-78.
Lett HS, Blumenthal JA, Babyak MA, et al. Social support and coronary heart disease: epidemiologic evidence and implications for treatment. Psychosom Med. 2005;67(6):869-78.
Lett, H. S., Blumenthal, J. A., Babyak, M. A., Strauman, T. J., Robins, C., & Sherwood, A. (2005). Social support and coronary heart disease: epidemiologic evidence and implications for treatment. Psychosomatic Medicine, 67(6), 869-78.
Lett HS, et al. Social Support and Coronary Heart Disease: Epidemiologic Evidence and Implications for Treatment. Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):869-78. PubMed PMID: 16314591.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social support and coronary heart disease: epidemiologic evidence and implications for treatment. AU - Lett,Heather S, AU - Blumenthal,James A, AU - Babyak,Michael A, AU - Strauman,Timothy J, AU - Robins,Clive, AU - Sherwood,Andrew, PY - 2005/11/30/pubmed PY - 2006/4/12/medline PY - 2005/11/30/entrez SP - 869 EP - 78 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 67 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The present paper reviews theories of social support and evidence for the role of social support in the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Articles for the primary review of social support as a risk factor were identified with MEDLINE (1966-2004) and PsychINFO (1872-2004). Reviews of bibliographies also were used to identify relevant articles. RESULTS: In general, evidence suggests that low social support confers a risk of 1.5 to 2.0 in both healthy populations and in patients with established CHD. However, there is substantial variability in the manner in which social support is conceptualized and measured. In addition, few studies have simultaneously compared differing types of support. CONCLUSIONS: Although low levels of support are associated with increased risk for CHD events, it is not clear what types of support are most associated with clinical outcomes in healthy persons and CHD patients. The development of a consensus in the conceptualization and measurement of social support is needed to examine which types of support are most likely to be associated with adverse CHD outcomes. There also is little evidence that improving low social support reduces CHD events. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16314591/Social_support_and_coronary_heart_disease:_epidemiologic_evidence_and_implications_for_treatment_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.psy.0000188393.73571.0a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -