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C-reactive protein, adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors in a Mediterranean population.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Mar; 30(3):468-74.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Understanding the distribution of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and its relations with classic cardiovascular risk factors in specific populations is important for further diagnostic use.

METHODS

We studied 1,157 adult subjects (652 women and 505 men) participating in the Health Study of Catalonia. CRP concentrations were measured with a high-sensitivity turbidimetric assay.

RESULTS

Median levels of CRP were 1.57 mg/l and 25% of both men and women had CRP values >3 mg/l. No differences were observed between men and women even after adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI). After patients with CRP values above the 97.5th percentile (n = 31) had been excluded, CRP concentrations increased significantly with increasing levels of cardiovascular risk factors in both men and women. Men and women with metabolic syndrome showed significantly higher levels of CRP than their counterparts, even after adjustment for BMI and age. In a multiple regression analysis, BMI, triglycerides and fasting glucose were independent predictors of CRP in women and together explained 42% of its variance. In men, CRP was independently and positively associated to waist circumference, smoking, diastolic blood pressure, uric acid and triglycerides, and negatively associated to HDL-cholesterol. Altogether these variables explained 51% of its variability.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study describes, for the first time, CRP concentrations in a sample that is representative of a Spanish Mediterranean community. CRP distribution and correlates are very similar to those reported previously in spite of the different lifestyle and nutritional habits, and the lower rates of cardiovascular diseases in our population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Faculty of Medicine of Reus, Rovira i Virgili University, 43201 Reus, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16314875

Citation

García-Lorda, P, et al. "C-reactive Protein, Adiposity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Mediterranean Population." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 30, no. 3, 2006, pp. 468-74.
García-Lorda P, Bulló M, Balanzà R, et al. C-reactive protein, adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors in a Mediterranean population. Int J Obes (Lond). 2006;30(3):468-74.
García-Lorda, P., Bulló, M., Balanzà, R., & Salas-Salvadó, J. (2006). C-reactive protein, adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors in a Mediterranean population. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 30(3), 468-74.
García-Lorda P, et al. C-reactive Protein, Adiposity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Mediterranean Population. Int J Obes (Lond). 2006;30(3):468-74. PubMed PMID: 16314875.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - C-reactive protein, adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors in a Mediterranean population. AU - García-Lorda,P, AU - Bulló,M, AU - Balanzà,R, AU - Salas-Salvadó,J, PY - 2005/11/30/pubmed PY - 2006/4/7/medline PY - 2005/11/30/entrez SP - 468 EP - 74 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Understanding the distribution of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and its relations with classic cardiovascular risk factors in specific populations is important for further diagnostic use. METHODS: We studied 1,157 adult subjects (652 women and 505 men) participating in the Health Study of Catalonia. CRP concentrations were measured with a high-sensitivity turbidimetric assay. RESULTS: Median levels of CRP were 1.57 mg/l and 25% of both men and women had CRP values >3 mg/l. No differences were observed between men and women even after adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI). After patients with CRP values above the 97.5th percentile (n = 31) had been excluded, CRP concentrations increased significantly with increasing levels of cardiovascular risk factors in both men and women. Men and women with metabolic syndrome showed significantly higher levels of CRP than their counterparts, even after adjustment for BMI and age. In a multiple regression analysis, BMI, triglycerides and fasting glucose were independent predictors of CRP in women and together explained 42% of its variance. In men, CRP was independently and positively associated to waist circumference, smoking, diastolic blood pressure, uric acid and triglycerides, and negatively associated to HDL-cholesterol. Altogether these variables explained 51% of its variability. CONCLUSIONS: The present study describes, for the first time, CRP concentrations in a sample that is representative of a Spanish Mediterranean community. CRP distribution and correlates are very similar to those reported previously in spite of the different lifestyle and nutritional habits, and the lower rates of cardiovascular diseases in our population. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16314875/C_reactive_protein_adiposity_and_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_a_Mediterranean_population_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803182 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -