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An experimental demonstration that fear, but not disgust, is associated with return of fear in phobias.
J Anxiety Disord. 2006; 20(1):58-71.JA

Abstract

It has been suggested that disgust, rather than anxiety, may be important in some phobias. Correlational studies have been ambiguous, indicating either that disgust increases phobic anxiety or that phobic anxiety potentiates disgust. In the experimental study reported here, disgust and phobic anxiety were manipulated in the context of habituation to phobic stimuli. Spider fearful participants were randomly allocated to conditions in which neutral, disgusting, and phobic anxiety provoking stimuli were introduced into a video-based spider phobic habituation sequence. Exposure to the phobic stimulus resulted in a return of self-reported fear and disgust levels. However, exposure to disgusting stimulus increased disgust levels, but not anxiety levels. Results are most consistent with the hypothesis that fear enhances the disgust response in phobias, but that disgust alone does not enhance the fear response. Previously observed links between disgust and spider phobia may be a consequence of fear enhancing disgust.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology (P.O. Box 077), Institute of Psychiatry, de Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16325114

Citation

Edwards, Sarah, and Paul M. Salkovskis. "An Experimental Demonstration That Fear, but Not Disgust, Is Associated With Return of Fear in Phobias." Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 20, no. 1, 2006, pp. 58-71.
Edwards S, Salkovskis PM. An experimental demonstration that fear, but not disgust, is associated with return of fear in phobias. J Anxiety Disord. 2006;20(1):58-71.
Edwards, S., & Salkovskis, P. M. (2006). An experimental demonstration that fear, but not disgust, is associated with return of fear in phobias. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 20(1), 58-71.
Edwards S, Salkovskis PM. An Experimental Demonstration That Fear, but Not Disgust, Is Associated With Return of Fear in Phobias. J Anxiety Disord. 2006;20(1):58-71. PubMed PMID: 16325114.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An experimental demonstration that fear, but not disgust, is associated with return of fear in phobias. AU - Edwards,Sarah, AU - Salkovskis,Paul M, Y1 - 2005/01/21/ PY - 2004/09/07/received PY - 2004/10/29/revised PY - 2004/11/22/accepted PY - 2005/12/6/pubmed PY - 2006/5/12/medline PY - 2005/12/6/entrez SP - 58 EP - 71 JF - Journal of anxiety disorders JO - J Anxiety Disord VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - It has been suggested that disgust, rather than anxiety, may be important in some phobias. Correlational studies have been ambiguous, indicating either that disgust increases phobic anxiety or that phobic anxiety potentiates disgust. In the experimental study reported here, disgust and phobic anxiety were manipulated in the context of habituation to phobic stimuli. Spider fearful participants were randomly allocated to conditions in which neutral, disgusting, and phobic anxiety provoking stimuli were introduced into a video-based spider phobic habituation sequence. Exposure to the phobic stimulus resulted in a return of self-reported fear and disgust levels. However, exposure to disgusting stimulus increased disgust levels, but not anxiety levels. Results are most consistent with the hypothesis that fear enhances the disgust response in phobias, but that disgust alone does not enhance the fear response. Previously observed links between disgust and spider phobia may be a consequence of fear enhancing disgust. SN - 0887-6185 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16325114/An_experimental_demonstration_that_fear_but_not_disgust_is_associated_with_return_of_fear_in_phobias_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-6185(04)00132-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -