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Anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia in 12-36-mo-old children from low-income families.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Dec; 82(6):1269-75.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world and remains relatively common in at-risk groups in the United States. The actual prevalence of anemia, ID, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in California remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to determine the prevalence of anemia, low iron stores, ID, and IDA in children participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) population, and to assess the value of using hemoglobin to predict ID.

DESIGN

This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of 12-36-mo-old children from WIC clinics in 2 California counties.

RESULTS

The prevalence of anemia was 11.1% (hemoglobin <110 g/L at 12-24 mo or <111 g/L at 24-36 mo). Study- and literature-determined abnormal values for iron measures were as follows: serum ferritin <or=8.7 or <10.0 microg/L, serum transferrin receptor >or=8.4 or >10.0 microg/mL, and transferrin saturation <or=13.2% or <10.0%, respectively. The prevalences of low iron stores (low ferritin) were 24.8% and 29.0%, of ID (>or=2 abnormal iron measures) were 16.2% and 8.8%, and of IDA (ID with low hemoglobin) were 3.4% and 3.2% on the basis of study- and literature-determined cutoffs, respectively. Hemoglobin concentration was used to predict study- and literature-determined ID on the basis of receiver operating characteristic curves. The sensitivity of low hemoglobin in predicting study- and literature-determined ID was low (23.2% and 40.0%, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Anemia and ID were prevalent in this WIC sample, but IDA was uncommon. Low hemoglobin is a poor predictor of ID.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16332660

Citation

Schneider, Julie M., et al. "Anemia, Iron Deficiency, and Iron Deficiency Anemia in 12-36-mo-old Children From Low-income Families." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 82, no. 6, 2005, pp. 1269-75.
Schneider JM, Fujii ML, Lamp CL, et al. Anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia in 12-36-mo-old children from low-income families. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;82(6):1269-75.
Schneider, J. M., Fujii, M. L., Lamp, C. L., Lönnerdal, B., Dewey, K. G., & Zidenberg-Cherr, S. (2005). Anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia in 12-36-mo-old children from low-income families. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 82(6), 1269-75.
Schneider JM, et al. Anemia, Iron Deficiency, and Iron Deficiency Anemia in 12-36-mo-old Children From Low-income Families. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;82(6):1269-75. PubMed PMID: 16332660.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia in 12-36-mo-old children from low-income families. AU - Schneider,Julie M, AU - Fujii,Mary L, AU - Lamp,Catherine L, AU - Lönnerdal,Bo, AU - Dewey,Kathryn G, AU - Zidenberg-Cherr,Sheri, PY - 2005/12/8/pubmed PY - 2006/1/6/medline PY - 2005/12/8/entrez SP - 1269 EP - 75 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 82 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world and remains relatively common in at-risk groups in the United States. The actual prevalence of anemia, ID, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in California remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the prevalence of anemia, low iron stores, ID, and IDA in children participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) population, and to assess the value of using hemoglobin to predict ID. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of 12-36-mo-old children from WIC clinics in 2 California counties. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia was 11.1% (hemoglobin <110 g/L at 12-24 mo or <111 g/L at 24-36 mo). Study- and literature-determined abnormal values for iron measures were as follows: serum ferritin <or=8.7 or <10.0 microg/L, serum transferrin receptor >or=8.4 or >10.0 microg/mL, and transferrin saturation <or=13.2% or <10.0%, respectively. The prevalences of low iron stores (low ferritin) were 24.8% and 29.0%, of ID (>or=2 abnormal iron measures) were 16.2% and 8.8%, and of IDA (ID with low hemoglobin) were 3.4% and 3.2% on the basis of study- and literature-determined cutoffs, respectively. Hemoglobin concentration was used to predict study- and literature-determined ID on the basis of receiver operating characteristic curves. The sensitivity of low hemoglobin in predicting study- and literature-determined ID was low (23.2% and 40.0%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Anemia and ID were prevalent in this WIC sample, but IDA was uncommon. Low hemoglobin is a poor predictor of ID. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16332660/Anemia_iron_deficiency_and_iron_deficiency_anemia_in_12_36_mo_old_children_from_low_income_families_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/82.6.1269 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -