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Correlates of perceived difficulty in potentially disclosing HIV-positive test results: a study of low-income women attending an urban clinic.
Sex Health. 2005; 2(2):103-7.SH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The study identified correlates of women's perception that testing positive for HIV would be very difficult to communicate to friends, family members and sex partners. We also determined whether perceived disclosure difficulty was associated with HIV-testing intent.

METHODS

Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 143 women attending an urgent care centre in Atlanta, Georgia. The centre served primarily low-income or indigent African-American women. A three-item scale (alpha = 0.81) assessed disclosure difficulty. Assessed correlates included selected social/contextual factors and intrapersonal factors.

RESULTS

In controlled multivariate analyses, only the social/contextual factors were associated with HIV disclosure difficulty. Women perceiving an inability to cope with positive results were more likely to report high disclosure difficulty (P = 0.01). Women perceiving an inadequate support system and those believing that HIV would substantially complicate their lives were more likely to anticipate high disclosure difficulty (P = 0.006 and P = 0.03, respectively). Disclosure difficulty was not associated with intent for HIV-testing 'today' (P = 0.50) or within the next 12 months (P = 0.27).

CONCLUSION

Findings provide initial evidence suggesting that selected social/contextual factors rather than intrapersonal factors are associated with anticipated disclosure difficulty of HIV-positive test results among low-income minority women, residing in the urban south. High levels of anticipated disclosure difficulty may not preclude HIV test acceptance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. rcrosby@sph.emory.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16335747

Citation

Crosby, Richard, et al. "Correlates of Perceived Difficulty in Potentially Disclosing HIV-positive Test Results: a Study of Low-income Women Attending an Urban Clinic." Sexual Health, vol. 2, no. 2, 2005, pp. 103-7.
Crosby R, Bonney EA, Odenat L. Correlates of perceived difficulty in potentially disclosing HIV-positive test results: a study of low-income women attending an urban clinic. Sex Health. 2005;2(2):103-7.
Crosby, R., Bonney, E. A., & Odenat, L. (2005). Correlates of perceived difficulty in potentially disclosing HIV-positive test results: a study of low-income women attending an urban clinic. Sexual Health, 2(2), 103-7.
Crosby R, Bonney EA, Odenat L. Correlates of Perceived Difficulty in Potentially Disclosing HIV-positive Test Results: a Study of Low-income Women Attending an Urban Clinic. Sex Health. 2005;2(2):103-7. PubMed PMID: 16335747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Correlates of perceived difficulty in potentially disclosing HIV-positive test results: a study of low-income women attending an urban clinic. AU - Crosby,Richard, AU - Bonney,Elizabeth A, AU - Odenat,Lydia, PY - 2005/12/13/pubmed PY - 2006/1/28/medline PY - 2005/12/13/entrez SP - 103 EP - 7 JF - Sexual health JO - Sex Health VL - 2 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The study identified correlates of women's perception that testing positive for HIV would be very difficult to communicate to friends, family members and sex partners. We also determined whether perceived disclosure difficulty was associated with HIV-testing intent. METHODS: Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 143 women attending an urgent care centre in Atlanta, Georgia. The centre served primarily low-income or indigent African-American women. A three-item scale (alpha = 0.81) assessed disclosure difficulty. Assessed correlates included selected social/contextual factors and intrapersonal factors. RESULTS: In controlled multivariate analyses, only the social/contextual factors were associated with HIV disclosure difficulty. Women perceiving an inability to cope with positive results were more likely to report high disclosure difficulty (P = 0.01). Women perceiving an inadequate support system and those believing that HIV would substantially complicate their lives were more likely to anticipate high disclosure difficulty (P = 0.006 and P = 0.03, respectively). Disclosure difficulty was not associated with intent for HIV-testing 'today' (P = 0.50) or within the next 12 months (P = 0.27). CONCLUSION: Findings provide initial evidence suggesting that selected social/contextual factors rather than intrapersonal factors are associated with anticipated disclosure difficulty of HIV-positive test results among low-income minority women, residing in the urban south. High levels of anticipated disclosure difficulty may not preclude HIV test acceptance. SN - 1448-5028 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16335747/Correlates_of_perceived_difficulty_in_potentially_disclosing_HIV_positive_test_results:_a_study_of_low_income_women_attending_an_urban_clinic_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9735 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -