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Child survival in a rural area in Zimbabwe: are we winning?
Cent Afr J Med. 1992 Jan; 38(1):30-6.CA

Abstract

Health teams in a rural district in Zimbabwe have been implementing child survival programmes since 1984. A prospective study of the causes of morbidity and mortality in under-five children was done. Community based surveys assessing nutrition status, immunisation coverage and knowledge and use of sugar and salt solution for diarrhoea were carried out. Malnutrition, acute respiratory infections and diarrhoea accounted for 69.7 pc of the 902 under-fives admissions while 33 (67.4 pc) of the hospital deaths were under-fives. The mortality pattern parallelled that of morbidity. Malnutrition was more common in the dry communal areas and on the commercial estates. Full immunisation coverage rates in the 12-23-month-olds increased from 44.3 pc in 1984 to 70 pc in 1989; and up to 69 pc of the mothers correctly prepared and used sugar and salt solution for diarrhoea management. Although there appears to have been little impact on malnutrition, respiratory infections and diarrhoea, the study shows that a lot can be achieved even in a remote rural district given political will, community involvement, and dedicated staff. The maintenance of the current momentum and the introduction of further socio-economic reforms is a big challenge facing the health teams, community members and politicians.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Chimanimani Hospital, Zimbabwe.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1633616

Citation

Tumwine, J K., and S Mackenzie. "Child Survival in a Rural Area in Zimbabwe: Are We Winning?" The Central African Journal of Medicine, vol. 38, no. 1, 1992, pp. 30-6.
Tumwine JK, Mackenzie S. Child survival in a rural area in Zimbabwe: are we winning? Cent Afr J Med. 1992;38(1):30-6.
Tumwine, J. K., & Mackenzie, S. (1992). Child survival in a rural area in Zimbabwe: are we winning? The Central African Journal of Medicine, 38(1), 30-6.
Tumwine JK, Mackenzie S. Child Survival in a Rural Area in Zimbabwe: Are We Winning. Cent Afr J Med. 1992;38(1):30-6. PubMed PMID: 1633616.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Child survival in a rural area in Zimbabwe: are we winning? AU - Tumwine,J K, AU - Mackenzie,S, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Age Factors KW - Child KW - Child Survival KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Eastern Africa KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Health KW - Health Facilities KW - Health Services KW - Hospitals KW - Information KW - Information Processing KW - Length Of Life KW - Morbidity KW - Mortality KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Prospective Studies KW - Records KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Rural Population KW - Sampling Studies KW - Studies KW - Surveys KW - Survivorship KW - Youth KW - Zimbabwe SP - 30 EP - 6 JF - The Central African journal of medicine JO - Cent Afr J Med VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - Health teams in a rural district in Zimbabwe have been implementing child survival programmes since 1984. A prospective study of the causes of morbidity and mortality in under-five children was done. Community based surveys assessing nutrition status, immunisation coverage and knowledge and use of sugar and salt solution for diarrhoea were carried out. Malnutrition, acute respiratory infections and diarrhoea accounted for 69.7 pc of the 902 under-fives admissions while 33 (67.4 pc) of the hospital deaths were under-fives. The mortality pattern parallelled that of morbidity. Malnutrition was more common in the dry communal areas and on the commercial estates. Full immunisation coverage rates in the 12-23-month-olds increased from 44.3 pc in 1984 to 70 pc in 1989; and up to 69 pc of the mothers correctly prepared and used sugar and salt solution for diarrhoea management. Although there appears to have been little impact on malnutrition, respiratory infections and diarrhoea, the study shows that a lot can be achieved even in a remote rural district given political will, community involvement, and dedicated staff. The maintenance of the current momentum and the introduction of further socio-economic reforms is a big challenge facing the health teams, community members and politicians. SN - 0008-9176 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1633616/Child_survival_in_a_rural_area_in_Zimbabwe:_are_we_winning L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/ruralhealthconcerns.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -