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Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease.
J Clin Gastroenterol 2006; 40(1):33-6JC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION/AIM

Patients with celiac disease (CD) can develop a gluten related autoimmune disorder that affects not only the small intestine but other tissues as well. An increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases has been reported, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to characterize thyroid disorders in patients with CD.

PATIENTS/METHODS

Fifty-two patients with CD (43 female, 9 male; mean age, 41.1 years) were studied. Nine were on a gluten-free diet (GFD). They were divided into four groups: Group 1, without thyroid involvement (n=30); Groups 2A-C, with thyroid involvement (n=22); Group 2A, subclinical hypothyroidism (n=11); Group 2B, clinical hypothyroidism (n=10); and Group 2C, other thyroid disorders (n=1). CD was confirmed by serologic and histologic criteria. Thyroid involvement was detected by measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO).

RESULTS

Increased levels of TSH and/or anti-TPO levels were detected in Groups 2A (21.1%) and 2B (19.2%). The patients of Group 2B presented clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism before the diagnosis of CD, and 5 of these patients were receiving levothyroxine. One woman (Group 2C; 1.92%) had a medullary carcinoma. There was statistical significance between the age when thyroid disease was diagnosed (current age) and the age of CD diagnosis between Groups 1 and 2B. Patients with thyroid involvement presented associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus (2), Down's syndrome (2), ulcerative colitis (1), and dermatitis herpetiformis (2).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings demonstrated an increased prevalence of thyroid disorders (hypothyroidism, 19.2%; and subclinical hypothyroidism, 21.2%), and other associated diseases in celiac patients, even on a GFD, increasing with the age of the patients. Screening for associated diseases is recommended for patients with CD, independent of age at diagnosis or treatment duration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gastroenterology Service, Cajuru Hospital, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Brazil. loretekotze@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16340631

Citation

da Silva Kotze, Lorete Maria, et al. "Thyroid Disorders in Brazilian Patients With Celiac Disease." Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 40, no. 1, 2006, pp. 33-6.
da Silva Kotze LM, Nisihara RM, da Rosa Utiyama SR, et al. Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2006;40(1):33-6.
da Silva Kotze, L. M., Nisihara, R. M., da Rosa Utiyama, S. R., Piovezan, G. C., & Kotze, L. R. (2006). Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 40(1), pp. 33-6.
da Silva Kotze LM, et al. Thyroid Disorders in Brazilian Patients With Celiac Disease. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2006;40(1):33-6. PubMed PMID: 16340631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease. AU - da Silva Kotze,Lorete Maria, AU - Nisihara,Renato Mitsunori, AU - da Rosa Utiyama,Shirley Ramos, AU - Piovezan,Gislaine Custodio, AU - Kotze,Luiz Roberto, PY - 2005/12/13/pubmed PY - 2006/3/17/medline PY - 2005/12/13/entrez SP - 33 EP - 6 JF - Journal of clinical gastroenterology JO - J. Clin. Gastroenterol. VL - 40 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION/AIM: Patients with celiac disease (CD) can develop a gluten related autoimmune disorder that affects not only the small intestine but other tissues as well. An increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases has been reported, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to characterize thyroid disorders in patients with CD. PATIENTS/METHODS: Fifty-two patients with CD (43 female, 9 male; mean age, 41.1 years) were studied. Nine were on a gluten-free diet (GFD). They were divided into four groups: Group 1, without thyroid involvement (n=30); Groups 2A-C, with thyroid involvement (n=22); Group 2A, subclinical hypothyroidism (n=11); Group 2B, clinical hypothyroidism (n=10); and Group 2C, other thyroid disorders (n=1). CD was confirmed by serologic and histologic criteria. Thyroid involvement was detected by measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). RESULTS: Increased levels of TSH and/or anti-TPO levels were detected in Groups 2A (21.1%) and 2B (19.2%). The patients of Group 2B presented clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism before the diagnosis of CD, and 5 of these patients were receiving levothyroxine. One woman (Group 2C; 1.92%) had a medullary carcinoma. There was statistical significance between the age when thyroid disease was diagnosed (current age) and the age of CD diagnosis between Groups 1 and 2B. Patients with thyroid involvement presented associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus (2), Down's syndrome (2), ulcerative colitis (1), and dermatitis herpetiformis (2). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrated an increased prevalence of thyroid disorders (hypothyroidism, 19.2%; and subclinical hypothyroidism, 21.2%), and other associated diseases in celiac patients, even on a GFD, increasing with the age of the patients. Screening for associated diseases is recommended for patients with CD, independent of age at diagnosis or treatment duration. SN - 0192-0790 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16340631/Thyroid_disorders_in_Brazilian_patients_with_celiac_disease_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16340631 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -