Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Obesity and migraine: a population study.
Neurology 2006; 66(4):545-50Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the influence of body mass index (BMI) on the prevalence, attack frequency, and clinical features of migraine.

METHODS

In a population-based telephone interview study, the authors gathered information on headache, height, and weight. The 30,215 participants were divided into five categories, based on BMI: 1, underweight (< 18.5), normal weight (18.5 to 24.9), overweight (25 to 29.9), obese (30 to 24.9), and morbidly obese (> or = 35). Migraine prevalence and modeled headache features were assessed as a function of BMI, adjusting by covariates (age, sex, marital status, income, medical treatment, depression).

RESULTS

Subjects were predominantly female (65% female) and in middle life (mean age 38.4). BMI group was not associated with the prevalence of migraine, but was associated with the frequency of headache attacks. In the normal weight group, 4.4% had 10 to 15 headache days per month, increasing to 5.8% of the overweight (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3), 13.6% of the obese (OR = 2.9), and 20.7% of the morbidly obese (OR = 5.7). The proportion of subjects with severe headache pain increased with BMI, doubling in the morbidly obese relative to the normally weighted (OR = 1.9). Similar significant associations were demonstrated with BMI category for disability, photophobia, and phonophobia.

CONCLUSION

Though migraine prevalence is not associated with body mass index, attack frequency, severity, and clinical features of migraine increase with body mass index group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. mbigal@aecom.yu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16354886

Citation

Bigal, Marcelo E., et al. "Obesity and Migraine: a Population Study." Neurology, vol. 66, no. 4, 2006, pp. 545-50.
Bigal ME, Liberman JN, Lipton RB. Obesity and migraine: a population study. Neurology. 2006;66(4):545-50.
Bigal, M. E., Liberman, J. N., & Lipton, R. B. (2006). Obesity and migraine: a population study. Neurology, 66(4), pp. 545-50.
Bigal ME, Liberman JN, Lipton RB. Obesity and Migraine: a Population Study. Neurology. 2006 Feb 28;66(4):545-50. PubMed PMID: 16354886.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity and migraine: a population study. AU - Bigal,Marcelo E, AU - Liberman,Joshua N, AU - Lipton,Richard B, Y1 - 2005/12/14/ PY - 2005/12/16/pubmed PY - 2006/3/21/medline PY - 2005/12/16/entrez SP - 545 EP - 50 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 66 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of body mass index (BMI) on the prevalence, attack frequency, and clinical features of migraine. METHODS: In a population-based telephone interview study, the authors gathered information on headache, height, and weight. The 30,215 participants were divided into five categories, based on BMI: 1, underweight (< 18.5), normal weight (18.5 to 24.9), overweight (25 to 29.9), obese (30 to 24.9), and morbidly obese (> or = 35). Migraine prevalence and modeled headache features were assessed as a function of BMI, adjusting by covariates (age, sex, marital status, income, medical treatment, depression). RESULTS: Subjects were predominantly female (65% female) and in middle life (mean age 38.4). BMI group was not associated with the prevalence of migraine, but was associated with the frequency of headache attacks. In the normal weight group, 4.4% had 10 to 15 headache days per month, increasing to 5.8% of the overweight (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3), 13.6% of the obese (OR = 2.9), and 20.7% of the morbidly obese (OR = 5.7). The proportion of subjects with severe headache pain increased with BMI, doubling in the morbidly obese relative to the normally weighted (OR = 1.9). Similar significant associations were demonstrated with BMI category for disability, photophobia, and phonophobia. CONCLUSION: Though migraine prevalence is not associated with body mass index, attack frequency, severity, and clinical features of migraine increase with body mass index group. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16354886/Obesity_and_migraine:_a_population_study_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16354886 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -