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The spread of the H5N1 bird flu epidemic in Asia in 2004.
Arch Virol Suppl 2005; (19):117-29AV

Abstract

H5N1 avian influenza has spread to eight countries in eastern Asia including China, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and Indonesia in early 2004. This H5N1 influenza A virus is extremely virulent in poultry including chickens and ducks, killing millions of birds throughout the region. Additionally this virus has transmitted to humans (mainly children) in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand, killing 54 of 100 diagnosed persons. To control this epidemic hundreds of millions of chickens and ducks have been culled. One genotype of H5N1 designated "Z" has become dominant in Asia. This virus was first detected in wild birds in Hong Kong in November 2002 and was antigenically distinct from H5N1 viruses isolated from 1997 to early 2002 and lethal for aquatic birds. The H5N1 virus infecting humans and poultry in Asia in 2004 is an antigenic variant of the Z genotype. Here we consider the possible role of migrating birds in the evolution and spread of the H5N1 influenza A virus throughout Asia. We conclude that the available information is consistent with a role for migrating birds but limited information is available and that serological studies are urgently needed on migrating birds worldwide. The prospect is that this H5N1/04 influenza A virus will become endemic in poultry in eastern Asia and will be a continuing threat to animal and human health. It is also projected that a human H5N1 vaccine will eventually be needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Virology, Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA. robert.webster@stjude.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16358424

Citation

Webster, R G., et al. "The Spread of the H5N1 Bird Flu Epidemic in Asia in 2004." Archives of Virology. Supplementum, 2005, pp. 117-29.
Webster RG, Guan Y, Poon L, et al. The spread of the H5N1 bird flu epidemic in Asia in 2004. Arch Virol Suppl. 2005.
Webster, R. G., Guan, Y., Poon, L., Krauss, S., Webby, R., Govorkovai, E., & Peiris, M. (2005). The spread of the H5N1 bird flu epidemic in Asia in 2004. Archives of Virology. Supplementum, (19), pp. 117-29.
Webster RG, et al. The Spread of the H5N1 Bird Flu Epidemic in Asia in 2004. Arch Virol Suppl. 2005;(19)117-29. PubMed PMID: 16358424.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The spread of the H5N1 bird flu epidemic in Asia in 2004. AU - Webster,R G, AU - Guan,Y, AU - Poon,L, AU - Krauss,S, AU - Webby,R, AU - Govorkovai,E, AU - Peiris,M, PY - 2005/12/20/pubmed PY - 2006/2/8/medline PY - 2005/12/20/entrez SP - 117 EP - 29 JF - Archives of virology. Supplementum JO - Arch. Virol. Suppl. IS - 19 N2 - H5N1 avian influenza has spread to eight countries in eastern Asia including China, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and Indonesia in early 2004. This H5N1 influenza A virus is extremely virulent in poultry including chickens and ducks, killing millions of birds throughout the region. Additionally this virus has transmitted to humans (mainly children) in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand, killing 54 of 100 diagnosed persons. To control this epidemic hundreds of millions of chickens and ducks have been culled. One genotype of H5N1 designated "Z" has become dominant in Asia. This virus was first detected in wild birds in Hong Kong in November 2002 and was antigenically distinct from H5N1 viruses isolated from 1997 to early 2002 and lethal for aquatic birds. The H5N1 virus infecting humans and poultry in Asia in 2004 is an antigenic variant of the Z genotype. Here we consider the possible role of migrating birds in the evolution and spread of the H5N1 influenza A virus throughout Asia. We conclude that the available information is consistent with a role for migrating birds but limited information is available and that serological studies are urgently needed on migrating birds worldwide. The prospect is that this H5N1/04 influenza A virus will become endemic in poultry in eastern Asia and will be a continuing threat to animal and human health. It is also projected that a human H5N1 vaccine will eventually be needed. SN - 0939-1983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16358424/The_spread_of_the_H5N1_bird_flu_epidemic_in_Asia_in_2004_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/birdflu.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -