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The OSHA bloodborne pathogens standard.
Todays OR Nurse. 1992 Jul; 14(7):11-6.TO

Abstract

1. The OSHA Standard is intended to reduce the risks to health-care workers of exposure to bloodborne pathogens. Because the patient's HIV or HBV status is often unknown, the Standard focuses on reducing the risks of exposure to blood and those body fluids to which universal precautions apply. 2. Engineering and work practice controls to reduce the risk of exposure include techniques for handling, cleaning, and decontaminating instruments with minimal hand contact; using containers to pass surgical instruments; wearing puncture-resistant gloves; and using forceps or clamps to remove scalpel blades from knife handles. 3. Employers must provide personal protective equipment at no cost. This equipment must prevent blood or other potentially hazardous materials from passing through or reaching employee's work or street clothes, skin, eyes, mouth, or other mucous membranes during normal conditions for the duration of time used.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Guideline
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1636201

Citation

Jackson, M M., and G Pugliese. "The OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard." Today's or Nurse, vol. 14, no. 7, 1992, pp. 11-6.
Jackson MM, Pugliese G. The OSHA bloodborne pathogens standard. Todays OR Nurse. 1992;14(7):11-6.
Jackson, M. M., & Pugliese, G. (1992). The OSHA bloodborne pathogens standard. Today's or Nurse, 14(7), 11-6.
Jackson MM, Pugliese G. The OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Todays OR Nurse. 1992;14(7):11-6. PubMed PMID: 1636201.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The OSHA bloodborne pathogens standard. AU - Jackson,M M, AU - Pugliese,G, PY - 1992/7/1/pubmed PY - 1992/7/1/medline PY - 1992/7/1/entrez SP - 11 EP - 6 JF - Today's OR nurse JO - Todays OR Nurse VL - 14 IS - 7 N2 - 1. The OSHA Standard is intended to reduce the risks to health-care workers of exposure to bloodborne pathogens. Because the patient's HIV or HBV status is often unknown, the Standard focuses on reducing the risks of exposure to blood and those body fluids to which universal precautions apply. 2. Engineering and work practice controls to reduce the risk of exposure include techniques for handling, cleaning, and decontaminating instruments with minimal hand contact; using containers to pass surgical instruments; wearing puncture-resistant gloves; and using forceps or clamps to remove scalpel blades from knife handles. 3. Employers must provide personal protective equipment at no cost. This equipment must prevent blood or other potentially hazardous materials from passing through or reaching employee's work or street clothes, skin, eyes, mouth, or other mucous membranes during normal conditions for the duration of time used. SN - 0194-5181 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1636201/The_OSHA_bloodborne_pathogens_standard_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/hivaids.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -