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[Epidemiology of rabies virus and other lyssaviruses].
Nihon Rinsho. 2005 Dec; 63(12):2167-72.NR

Abstract

Rabies is a zoonosis that infects domestic and wild animals through close contacts with saliva from infected animals. The annual number of deaths worldwide caused by rabies is estimated approximately 55,000 by World Health Organization (WHO). There has been no indigenous rabies case in Japan since 1957; however, there was only one imported case, a traveler who was bitten by a stray dog in Nepal and died in 1970. Dogs in Asia and Africa remain the main reservoir and transmitter of rabies to humans. The others are mainly coyotes, foxes, jackals, mongooses, raccoons, skunks, wolves and bats. The efficacy of the current human and veterinary vaccines against emergent lyssaviruses should be evaluated because the newly discovered rabies-related viruses have been isolated from bats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University.

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

16363690

Citation

Arai, Yohko T.. "[Epidemiology of Rabies Virus and Other Lyssaviruses]." Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 63, no. 12, 2005, pp. 2167-72.
Arai YT. [Epidemiology of rabies virus and other lyssaviruses]. Nihon Rinsho. 2005;63(12):2167-72.
Arai, Y. T. (2005). [Epidemiology of rabies virus and other lyssaviruses]. Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine, 63(12), 2167-72.
Arai YT. [Epidemiology of Rabies Virus and Other Lyssaviruses]. Nihon Rinsho. 2005;63(12):2167-72. PubMed PMID: 16363690.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Epidemiology of rabies virus and other lyssaviruses]. A1 - Arai,Yohko T, PY - 2005/12/21/pubmed PY - 2006/3/11/medline PY - 2005/12/21/entrez SP - 2167 EP - 72 JF - Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine JO - Nihon Rinsho VL - 63 IS - 12 N2 - Rabies is a zoonosis that infects domestic and wild animals through close contacts with saliva from infected animals. The annual number of deaths worldwide caused by rabies is estimated approximately 55,000 by World Health Organization (WHO). There has been no indigenous rabies case in Japan since 1957; however, there was only one imported case, a traveler who was bitten by a stray dog in Nepal and died in 1970. Dogs in Asia and Africa remain the main reservoir and transmitter of rabies to humans. The others are mainly coyotes, foxes, jackals, mongooses, raccoons, skunks, wolves and bats. The efficacy of the current human and veterinary vaccines against emergent lyssaviruses should be evaluated because the newly discovered rabies-related viruses have been isolated from bats. SN - 0047-1852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16363690/[Epidemiology_of_rabies_virus_and_other_lyssaviruses]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6131 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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