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Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with earlier termination of breast-feeding among White women.
J Nutr 2006; 136(1):140-6JN

Abstract

High prepregnant BMI is associated with reduced initiation and duration of breast-feeding (BF). To examine how gestational weight gain (GWG) might modify this association, over a 9-y period, we identified all women (n = 2783) who had attempted to breast-feed their newborns. From their medical records, we categorized them by prepregnant BMI [as underweight (<19.8 kg/m2), normal-weight (19.8-26.0 kg/m2), overweight (26.1-29.0 kg/m2) or obese (>29.0 kg/m2)] and GWG [as below, within, or above the amount recommended by the Institute of Medicine]. Women with a normal BMI who gained within these recommendations served as the reference group in regression analyses, which were adjusted for confounding factors. Both normal-weight (P < 0.05) and obese (P < 0.01) women who exceeded the recommended GWG had higher odds of failing to initiate BF (defined as continuing to breast-feed at 4 d postpartum). Underweight (P < 0.05), overweight (P < 0.05), and obese (P < 0.01) women who exceeded the recommendations for GWG as well as obese women who gained within the recommendations (P < 0.01) had a higher risk of early discontinuation of exclusive BF. Only obese women who gained within or exceeded the recommendations (P < 0.01) for GWG had a higher risk of early discontinuation of any BF. Excessive GWG was associated with a measure of failure to initiate and/or sustain BF in all categories of prepregnant BMI. Thus, in addition to conceiving at a healthy weight, gaining the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy is also important for successful BF.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16365073

Citation

Hilson, Julie A., et al. "Excessive Weight Gain During Pregnancy Is Associated With Earlier Termination of Breast-feeding Among White Women." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 136, no. 1, 2006, pp. 140-6.
Hilson JA, Rasmussen KM, Kjolhede CL. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with earlier termination of breast-feeding among White women. J Nutr. 2006;136(1):140-6.
Hilson, J. A., Rasmussen, K. M., & Kjolhede, C. L. (2006). Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with earlier termination of breast-feeding among White women. The Journal of Nutrition, 136(1), pp. 140-6.
Hilson JA, Rasmussen KM, Kjolhede CL. Excessive Weight Gain During Pregnancy Is Associated With Earlier Termination of Breast-feeding Among White Women. J Nutr. 2006;136(1):140-6. PubMed PMID: 16365073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with earlier termination of breast-feeding among White women. AU - Hilson,Julie A, AU - Rasmussen,Kathleen M, AU - Kjolhede,Chris L, PY - 2005/12/21/pubmed PY - 2006/2/24/medline PY - 2005/12/21/entrez SP - 140 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 136 IS - 1 N2 - High prepregnant BMI is associated with reduced initiation and duration of breast-feeding (BF). To examine how gestational weight gain (GWG) might modify this association, over a 9-y period, we identified all women (n = 2783) who had attempted to breast-feed their newborns. From their medical records, we categorized them by prepregnant BMI [as underweight (<19.8 kg/m2), normal-weight (19.8-26.0 kg/m2), overweight (26.1-29.0 kg/m2) or obese (>29.0 kg/m2)] and GWG [as below, within, or above the amount recommended by the Institute of Medicine]. Women with a normal BMI who gained within these recommendations served as the reference group in regression analyses, which were adjusted for confounding factors. Both normal-weight (P < 0.05) and obese (P < 0.01) women who exceeded the recommended GWG had higher odds of failing to initiate BF (defined as continuing to breast-feed at 4 d postpartum). Underweight (P < 0.05), overweight (P < 0.05), and obese (P < 0.01) women who exceeded the recommendations for GWG as well as obese women who gained within the recommendations (P < 0.01) had a higher risk of early discontinuation of exclusive BF. Only obese women who gained within or exceeded the recommendations (P < 0.01) for GWG had a higher risk of early discontinuation of any BF. Excessive GWG was associated with a measure of failure to initiate and/or sustain BF in all categories of prepregnant BMI. Thus, in addition to conceiving at a healthy weight, gaining the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy is also important for successful BF. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16365073/Excessive_weight_gain_during_pregnancy_is_associated_with_earlier_termination_of_breast_feeding_among_White_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/136.1.140 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -