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Plant phenolics behave as radical scavengers in the context of insect (Manduca sexta) hemolymph and midgut fluid.
J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Dec 28; 53(26):10120-6.JA

Abstract

To evaluate the prooxidant versus antioxidant properties of plant phenolics toward leaf-feeding caterpillars, quenching of the stable ABTS radical by five phenolics was measured in two physiological contexts: hemolymph and midgut fluid. Addition of tannic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin, or catechin to Manduca sexta (L.) gut fluid increased its total antioxidant capacity by 12-45%, with tannic acid and quercetin being the most powerful in this regard. The antioxidant contribution of the phenolics increased with longer (30-60 min) incubation time in gut fluid. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid exhibited the weakest antioxidant activity in gut fluid. The total antioxidant capacity of hemolymph is considerably less than that of gut fluid, and in hemolymph chlorogenic and caffeic acids sometimes acted as mild prooxidants, particularly after longer incubation periods (30-60 min), although this trend was not statistically significant. Tannic acid, catechin, and quercetin behaved as antioxidants in hemolymph. These results suggest that many phenolics have radical scavenging activity in the digestive tract, but some may have more detrimental effects after absorption into the hemolymph compartment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701, USA. Johnsonk3@ohio.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16366704

Citation

Johnson, Kelly S.. "Plant Phenolics Behave as Radical Scavengers in the Context of Insect (Manduca Sexta) Hemolymph and Midgut Fluid." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 53, no. 26, 2005, pp. 10120-6.
Johnson KS. Plant phenolics behave as radical scavengers in the context of insect (Manduca sexta) hemolymph and midgut fluid. J Agric Food Chem. 2005;53(26):10120-6.
Johnson, K. S. (2005). Plant phenolics behave as radical scavengers in the context of insect (Manduca sexta) hemolymph and midgut fluid. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53(26), 10120-6.
Johnson KS. Plant Phenolics Behave as Radical Scavengers in the Context of Insect (Manduca Sexta) Hemolymph and Midgut Fluid. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Dec 28;53(26):10120-6. PubMed PMID: 16366704.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plant phenolics behave as radical scavengers in the context of insect (Manduca sexta) hemolymph and midgut fluid. A1 - Johnson,Kelly S, PY - 2005/12/22/pubmed PY - 2006/2/4/medline PY - 2005/12/22/entrez SP - 10120 EP - 6 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 53 IS - 26 N2 - To evaluate the prooxidant versus antioxidant properties of plant phenolics toward leaf-feeding caterpillars, quenching of the stable ABTS radical by five phenolics was measured in two physiological contexts: hemolymph and midgut fluid. Addition of tannic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin, or catechin to Manduca sexta (L.) gut fluid increased its total antioxidant capacity by 12-45%, with tannic acid and quercetin being the most powerful in this regard. The antioxidant contribution of the phenolics increased with longer (30-60 min) incubation time in gut fluid. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid exhibited the weakest antioxidant activity in gut fluid. The total antioxidant capacity of hemolymph is considerably less than that of gut fluid, and in hemolymph chlorogenic and caffeic acids sometimes acted as mild prooxidants, particularly after longer incubation periods (30-60 min), although this trend was not statistically significant. Tannic acid, catechin, and quercetin behaved as antioxidants in hemolymph. These results suggest that many phenolics have radical scavenging activity in the digestive tract, but some may have more detrimental effects after absorption into the hemolymph compartment. SN - 0021-8561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16366704/Plant_phenolics_behave_as_radical_scavengers_in_the_context_of_insect__Manduca_sexta__hemolymph_and_midgut_fluid_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf051942w DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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