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Phytate, calcium, iron, and zinc contents and their molar ratios in foods commonly consumed in China.
J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Dec 28; 53(26):10285-90.JA

Abstract

A total of 60 food samples commonly consumed in China were analyzed for phytate using the anion-exchange method and for calcium, iron, and zinc using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The foods analyzed included those based on cereal grains and soybean. Phytate contents expressed on a wet weight basis ranged from 0 for foods made from starches to 1878 mg/100 g for dried stick-shaped soybean milk film. The calcium contents were between 2.08 mg/100 g for ground corn and 760.67 mg/100 g for diced fried soybean curd. The lowest values of iron and zinc were 0.04 mg/100 g for Panjin pearl rice cooked with discarding extra water and 0.08 mg/100 g for potato and bean starches, while the highest values of iron and zinc were observed in dried stick-shaped soybean milk film. Although many foods were relatively rich in calcium, zinc, and iron, many also contained a higher level of phytate. Of the 60 food samples, 34 foods had a phytate/calcium molar ratio >0.24, 53 foods had a phytate/iron molar ratio >1, 31 foods had a phytate/zinc molar ratio >15, and only 7 foods had a phytate x calcium/zinc >200. Phytate in foods impair the bioavailability of calcium, iron, and zinc, which to some extent depends upon food processing and cooking methods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Food Safety and Nutrition, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, China. mags@chinacdc.net.cnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16366728

Citation

Ma, Guansheng, et al. "Phytate, Calcium, Iron, and Zinc Contents and Their Molar Ratios in Foods Commonly Consumed in China." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 53, no. 26, 2005, pp. 10285-90.
Ma G, Jin Y, Piao J, et al. Phytate, calcium, iron, and zinc contents and their molar ratios in foods commonly consumed in China. J Agric Food Chem. 2005;53(26):10285-90.
Ma, G., Jin, Y., Piao, J., Kok, F., Guusje, B., & Jacobsen, E. (2005). Phytate, calcium, iron, and zinc contents and their molar ratios in foods commonly consumed in China. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53(26), 10285-90.
Ma G, et al. Phytate, Calcium, Iron, and Zinc Contents and Their Molar Ratios in Foods Commonly Consumed in China. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Dec 28;53(26):10285-90. PubMed PMID: 16366728.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phytate, calcium, iron, and zinc contents and their molar ratios in foods commonly consumed in China. AU - Ma,Guansheng, AU - Jin,Ying, AU - Piao,Jianhua, AU - Kok,Frans, AU - Guusje,Bonnema, AU - Jacobsen,Evert, PY - 2005/12/22/pubmed PY - 2006/2/4/medline PY - 2005/12/22/entrez SP - 10285 EP - 90 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 53 IS - 26 N2 - A total of 60 food samples commonly consumed in China were analyzed for phytate using the anion-exchange method and for calcium, iron, and zinc using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The foods analyzed included those based on cereal grains and soybean. Phytate contents expressed on a wet weight basis ranged from 0 for foods made from starches to 1878 mg/100 g for dried stick-shaped soybean milk film. The calcium contents were between 2.08 mg/100 g for ground corn and 760.67 mg/100 g for diced fried soybean curd. The lowest values of iron and zinc were 0.04 mg/100 g for Panjin pearl rice cooked with discarding extra water and 0.08 mg/100 g for potato and bean starches, while the highest values of iron and zinc were observed in dried stick-shaped soybean milk film. Although many foods were relatively rich in calcium, zinc, and iron, many also contained a higher level of phytate. Of the 60 food samples, 34 foods had a phytate/calcium molar ratio >0.24, 53 foods had a phytate/iron molar ratio >1, 31 foods had a phytate/zinc molar ratio >15, and only 7 foods had a phytate x calcium/zinc >200. Phytate in foods impair the bioavailability of calcium, iron, and zinc, which to some extent depends upon food processing and cooking methods. SN - 0021-8561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16366728/Phytate_calcium_iron_and_zinc_contents_and_their_molar_ratios_in_foods_commonly_consumed_in_China_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf052051r DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -