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Objectivism in information utilization: theory and measurement.
J Pers Assess. 1986 Spring; 50(1):32-43.JP

Abstract

A self-report scale was constructed and validated that measures individual differences in objectivism--the tendency to base one's judgments and beliefs on empirical information and rational considerations. Validity data showed that, compared to people who score low on the Objectivism Scale, highly objective individuals enjoy thinking more, rely more on observable facts when making decisions, and place less emphasis on subjective and intuitive styles of decision making. Among graduate students in psychology, objectivism correlated positively with ratings of research-oriented careers, but negatively with ratings of mental health careers; also, highly objective students were more critical of nonobjective psychological assessment techniques and placed greater importance on research. Objectivism also predicted preferences for newspaper articles, college course selections, and the criteria respondents use when making decisions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16367446

Citation

Leary, M R., et al. "Objectivism in Information Utilization: Theory and Measurement." Journal of Personality Assessment, vol. 50, no. 1, 1986, pp. 32-43.
Leary MR, Shepperd JA, McNeil MS, et al. Objectivism in information utilization: theory and measurement. J Pers Assess. 1986;50(1):32-43.
Leary, M. R., Shepperd, J. A., McNeil, M. S., Jenkins, T. B., & Barnes, B. D. (1986). Objectivism in information utilization: theory and measurement. Journal of Personality Assessment, 50(1), 32-43.
Leary MR, et al. Objectivism in Information Utilization: Theory and Measurement. J Pers Assess. 1986;50(1):32-43. PubMed PMID: 16367446.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Objectivism in information utilization: theory and measurement. AU - Leary,M R, AU - Shepperd,J A, AU - McNeil,M S, AU - Jenkins,T B, AU - Barnes,B D, PY - 1986/4/1/pubmed PY - 1986/4/1/medline PY - 1986/4/1/entrez SP - 32 EP - 43 JF - Journal of personality assessment JO - J Pers Assess VL - 50 IS - 1 N2 - A self-report scale was constructed and validated that measures individual differences in objectivism--the tendency to base one's judgments and beliefs on empirical information and rational considerations. Validity data showed that, compared to people who score low on the Objectivism Scale, highly objective individuals enjoy thinking more, rely more on observable facts when making decisions, and place less emphasis on subjective and intuitive styles of decision making. Among graduate students in psychology, objectivism correlated positively with ratings of research-oriented careers, but negatively with ratings of mental health careers; also, highly objective students were more critical of nonobjective psychological assessment techniques and placed greater importance on research. Objectivism also predicted preferences for newspaper articles, college course selections, and the criteria respondents use when making decisions. SN - 0022-3891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16367446/Objectivism_in_information_utilization:_theory_and_measurement_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1207/s15327752jpa5001_5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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