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Racial differences in adiponectin in youth: relationship to visceral fat and insulin sensitivity.
Diabetes Care. 2006 Jan; 29(1):51-6.DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to investigate 1) whether adiponectin is associated with insulin sensitivity independent of visceral adipose tissue in African-American and Caucasian youth and 2) whether adiponectin is associated with racial differences in insulin sensitivity.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Total body fat was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal adipose tissue with computed tomography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp.

RESULTS

Adiponectin was inversely associated (P < 0.01) with visceral adipose tissue, fasting insulin, and proinsulin and was positively related (P < 0.01) to insulin sensitivity after controlling for Tanner stage and sex independent of race. Stepwise multiple regression revealed that adiponectin was a strong independent predictor of insulin sensitivity, explaining 27% of the variance in insulin sensitivity. When subjects were categorized into tertiles of visceral adipose tissue and further low (< or = 50th) and high (>50th) adiponectin groups, insulin sensitivity was significantly different across the visceral adipose tissue groups (main effect, P < 0.01) in both races. However, within each visceral adipose tissue group, subjects with high adiponectin had higher insulin sensitivity (main effect, P < 0.05) than subjects with low adiponectin, independent of race. Racial differences in insulin sensitivity remained significant (P < 0.01) after controlling for leptin and visceral adipose tissue but not (P > 0.05) after additional adjustment for adiponectin.

CONCLUSIONS

Adiponectin is associated with insulin sensitivity independent of visceral adipose tissue in both African-American and Caucasian youth. Low adiponectin in African-American youth may be a biological marker that predisposes them to a greater risk of insulin resistance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes Mellitus, Weight Management and Wellness Center, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, 3705 Fifth Avenue at DeSoto St., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16373895

Citation

Lee, SoJung, et al. "Racial Differences in Adiponectin in Youth: Relationship to Visceral Fat and Insulin Sensitivity." Diabetes Care, vol. 29, no. 1, 2006, pp. 51-6.
Lee S, Bacha F, Gungor N, et al. Racial differences in adiponectin in youth: relationship to visceral fat and insulin sensitivity. Diabetes Care. 2006;29(1):51-6.
Lee, S., Bacha, F., Gungor, N., & Arslanian, S. A. (2006). Racial differences in adiponectin in youth: relationship to visceral fat and insulin sensitivity. Diabetes Care, 29(1), 51-6.
Lee S, et al. Racial Differences in Adiponectin in Youth: Relationship to Visceral Fat and Insulin Sensitivity. Diabetes Care. 2006;29(1):51-6. PubMed PMID: 16373895.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial differences in adiponectin in youth: relationship to visceral fat and insulin sensitivity. AU - Lee,SoJung, AU - Bacha,Fida, AU - Gungor,Neslihan, AU - Arslanian,Silva A, PY - 2005/12/24/pubmed PY - 2006/3/9/medline PY - 2005/12/24/entrez SP - 51 EP - 6 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 29 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate 1) whether adiponectin is associated with insulin sensitivity independent of visceral adipose tissue in African-American and Caucasian youth and 2) whether adiponectin is associated with racial differences in insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total body fat was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal adipose tissue with computed tomography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. RESULTS: Adiponectin was inversely associated (P < 0.01) with visceral adipose tissue, fasting insulin, and proinsulin and was positively related (P < 0.01) to insulin sensitivity after controlling for Tanner stage and sex independent of race. Stepwise multiple regression revealed that adiponectin was a strong independent predictor of insulin sensitivity, explaining 27% of the variance in insulin sensitivity. When subjects were categorized into tertiles of visceral adipose tissue and further low (< or = 50th) and high (>50th) adiponectin groups, insulin sensitivity was significantly different across the visceral adipose tissue groups (main effect, P < 0.01) in both races. However, within each visceral adipose tissue group, subjects with high adiponectin had higher insulin sensitivity (main effect, P < 0.05) than subjects with low adiponectin, independent of race. Racial differences in insulin sensitivity remained significant (P < 0.01) after controlling for leptin and visceral adipose tissue but not (P > 0.05) after additional adjustment for adiponectin. CONCLUSIONS: Adiponectin is associated with insulin sensitivity independent of visceral adipose tissue in both African-American and Caucasian youth. Low adiponectin in African-American youth may be a biological marker that predisposes them to a greater risk of insulin resistance. SN - 0149-5992 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16373895/Racial_differences_in_adiponectin_in_youth:_relationship_to_visceral_fat_and_insulin_sensitivity_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16373895 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -