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CKD risk factors reported by primary care physicians: do guidelines make a difference?
Am J Kidney Dis. 2006 Jan; 47(1):72-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

End-stage renal disease is epidemic within the United States among certain high-risk groups. The National Kidney Disease Education Program examined the awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk factors among primary care physicians who treat high-risk populations, such as African Americans, persons with diabetes, persons with hypertension, and family members of dialysis patients.

METHODS

We conducted a survey of 465 primary care physicians in 4 communities with high-risk populations. Respondents were asked to score 9 potential CKD risk factors on a 4-point scale graded from "Does not increase risk at all" to "Increases risk greatly." Potential risk factors included African-American race, diabetes, hypertension, and family history of CKD.

RESULTS

Respondents saw a mean of 414 +/- 222 (SD) patients/mo. Primary care physicians were more likely to report that diabetes and hypertension were significant risk factors for CKD. Conversely, 34.4% did not consider family history of kidney disease to increase the risk for CKD, and 22% of respondents did not consider African-American race a CKD risk factor.

CONCLUSION

Primary care physicians need targeted education to increase awareness of populations at high risk for CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. jlea@emory.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16377387

Citation

Lea, Janice P., et al. "CKD Risk Factors Reported By Primary Care Physicians: Do Guidelines Make a Difference?" American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 47, no. 1, 2006, pp. 72-7.
Lea JP, McClellan WM, Melcher C, et al. CKD risk factors reported by primary care physicians: do guidelines make a difference? Am J Kidney Dis. 2006;47(1):72-7.
Lea, J. P., McClellan, W. M., Melcher, C., Gladstone, E., & Hostetter, T. (2006). CKD risk factors reported by primary care physicians: do guidelines make a difference? American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 47(1), 72-7.
Lea JP, et al. CKD Risk Factors Reported By Primary Care Physicians: Do Guidelines Make a Difference. Am J Kidney Dis. 2006;47(1):72-7. PubMed PMID: 16377387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CKD risk factors reported by primary care physicians: do guidelines make a difference? AU - Lea,Janice P, AU - McClellan,William M, AU - Melcher,Charlene, AU - Gladstone,Elisa, AU - Hostetter,Tom, PY - 2005/05/25/received PY - 2005/09/20/accepted PY - 2005/12/27/pubmed PY - 2006/2/10/medline PY - 2005/12/27/entrez SP - 72 EP - 7 JF - American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation JO - Am J Kidney Dis VL - 47 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: End-stage renal disease is epidemic within the United States among certain high-risk groups. The National Kidney Disease Education Program examined the awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk factors among primary care physicians who treat high-risk populations, such as African Americans, persons with diabetes, persons with hypertension, and family members of dialysis patients. METHODS: We conducted a survey of 465 primary care physicians in 4 communities with high-risk populations. Respondents were asked to score 9 potential CKD risk factors on a 4-point scale graded from "Does not increase risk at all" to "Increases risk greatly." Potential risk factors included African-American race, diabetes, hypertension, and family history of CKD. RESULTS: Respondents saw a mean of 414 +/- 222 (SD) patients/mo. Primary care physicians were more likely to report that diabetes and hypertension were significant risk factors for CKD. Conversely, 34.4% did not consider family history of kidney disease to increase the risk for CKD, and 22% of respondents did not consider African-American race a CKD risk factor. CONCLUSION: Primary care physicians need targeted education to increase awareness of populations at high risk for CKD. SN - 1523-6838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16377387/CKD_risk_factors_reported_by_primary_care_physicians:_do_guidelines_make_a_difference L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272-6386(05)01509-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -