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Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among low-income, African American women with a history of intimate partner violence and suicidal behaviors: self-esteem, social support, and religious coping.
J Trauma Stress. 2005 Dec; 18(6):685-96.JT

Abstract

There is a dearth of research on risk/protective factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among low-income African American women with a history of intimate partner violence (IPV), presenting for suicidal behavior or routine medical care in a large, urban hospital. We examined self-esteem, social support, and religious coping as mediators between experiences of child maltreatment (CM) and IPV and symptoms of PTSD in a sample (N = 134) of low-income African American women. Instruments used included the Index of Spouse Abuse, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Taylor Self-Esteem Inventory, the Multidimensional Profile of Social Support, the Brief Religious Coping Activities Scale, and the Davidson Trauma Scale. Both CM and IPV related positively to PTSD symptoms. Risk and resilience individual difference factors accounted for 18% of the variance in PTSD symptoms over and above IPV and CM, with self-esteem and negative religious coping making unique contributions. Both variables mediated the abuse-PTSD symptom link. In addition, we tested an alternate model in which PTSD symptoms mediated the relationship between abuse and both self-esteem and negative religious coping.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. rebekah.bradley@emory.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16382436

Citation

Bradley, Rebekah, et al. "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Low-income, African American Women With a History of Intimate Partner Violence and Suicidal Behaviors: Self-esteem, Social Support, and Religious Coping." Journal of Traumatic Stress, vol. 18, no. 6, 2005, pp. 685-96.
Bradley R, Schwartz AC, Kaslow NJ. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among low-income, African American women with a history of intimate partner violence and suicidal behaviors: self-esteem, social support, and religious coping. J Trauma Stress. 2005;18(6):685-96.
Bradley, R., Schwartz, A. C., & Kaslow, N. J. (2005). Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among low-income, African American women with a history of intimate partner violence and suicidal behaviors: self-esteem, social support, and religious coping. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 18(6), 685-96.
Bradley R, Schwartz AC, Kaslow NJ. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Low-income, African American Women With a History of Intimate Partner Violence and Suicidal Behaviors: Self-esteem, Social Support, and Religious Coping. J Trauma Stress. 2005;18(6):685-96. PubMed PMID: 16382436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among low-income, African American women with a history of intimate partner violence and suicidal behaviors: self-esteem, social support, and religious coping. AU - Bradley,Rebekah, AU - Schwartz,Ann C, AU - Kaslow,Nadine J, PY - 2005/12/31/pubmed PY - 2006/3/31/medline PY - 2005/12/31/entrez SP - 685 EP - 96 JF - Journal of traumatic stress JO - J Trauma Stress VL - 18 IS - 6 N2 - There is a dearth of research on risk/protective factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among low-income African American women with a history of intimate partner violence (IPV), presenting for suicidal behavior or routine medical care in a large, urban hospital. We examined self-esteem, social support, and religious coping as mediators between experiences of child maltreatment (CM) and IPV and symptoms of PTSD in a sample (N = 134) of low-income African American women. Instruments used included the Index of Spouse Abuse, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Taylor Self-Esteem Inventory, the Multidimensional Profile of Social Support, the Brief Religious Coping Activities Scale, and the Davidson Trauma Scale. Both CM and IPV related positively to PTSD symptoms. Risk and resilience individual difference factors accounted for 18% of the variance in PTSD symptoms over and above IPV and CM, with self-esteem and negative religious coping making unique contributions. Both variables mediated the abuse-PTSD symptom link. In addition, we tested an alternate model in which PTSD symptoms mediated the relationship between abuse and both self-esteem and negative religious coping. SN - 0894-9867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16382436/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder_symptoms_among_low_income_African_American_women_with_a_history_of_intimate_partner_violence_and_suicidal_behaviors:_self_esteem_social_support_and_religious_coping_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20077 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -