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Field studies on endoparasites of Thoroughbred foals on seven farms in central Kentucky in 2004.
Parasitol Res. 2006 Apr; 98(5):496-500.PR

Abstract

Fecal samples (n=1,584) for a parasite study were collected from Thoroughbred foals (n=349), 28 to 330 days old, on seven farms in central Kentucky during 49 monthly trips from May to October, November, or December 2004. The main purpose was to determine possible drug resistance of ascarids, also of strongyles, to ivermectin (IVM) and other commercially available compounds [fenbendazole, moxidectin (MOX), oxibendazole (OBZ), and pyrantel pamoate]. In addition, interest was on prevalence of foal parasites. Qualitative data were obtained by recording presence or absence of ascarid and strongyle eggs in feces from 7 to 25 days after treatment of some of the foals. None of the compounds completely eliminated ascarid eggs in feces of all foals posttreatment. Activity on ascarids was significantly the highest for OBZ and lowest for IVM. Activity on strongyles was significantly higher for IVM and MOX than for the other compounds. Prevalence (mean percentage of foals infected) was recorded for eggs of Parascaris equorum (39%), of strongyles (32%), and of Strongyloides westeri (2%) and oocysts of Eimeria leuckarti (28%) in feces of foals. One or more foals had infections of P. equorum on six farms (86%), strongyles on seven farms (100%), S. westeri on two farms (29%), and E. leuckarti on six farms (86%). The oldest foal infected with E. leuckarti was 301 days of age. Comparison was made on the prevalence of parasites in foals on five of the same farms in the 2004 study, which were part of a similar 14-farm project in 2003 (Lyons and Tolliver in Parasitol Res (2004) 92:400-404).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Science, Gluck Equine Research Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0099, USA. elyons1@uky.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16385405

Citation

Lyons, E T., et al. "Field Studies On Endoparasites of Thoroughbred Foals On Seven Farms in Central Kentucky in 2004." Parasitology Research, vol. 98, no. 5, 2006, pp. 496-500.
Lyons ET, Tolliver SC, Collins SS. Field studies on endoparasites of Thoroughbred foals on seven farms in central Kentucky in 2004. Parasitol Res. 2006;98(5):496-500.
Lyons, E. T., Tolliver, S. C., & Collins, S. S. (2006). Field studies on endoparasites of Thoroughbred foals on seven farms in central Kentucky in 2004. Parasitology Research, 98(5), 496-500.
Lyons ET, Tolliver SC, Collins SS. Field Studies On Endoparasites of Thoroughbred Foals On Seven Farms in Central Kentucky in 2004. Parasitol Res. 2006;98(5):496-500. PubMed PMID: 16385405.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Field studies on endoparasites of Thoroughbred foals on seven farms in central Kentucky in 2004. AU - Lyons,E T, AU - Tolliver,S C, AU - Collins,S S, Y1 - 2005/12/30/ PY - 2005/05/04/received PY - 2005/11/13/accepted PY - 2005/12/31/pubmed PY - 2007/6/30/medline PY - 2005/12/31/entrez SP - 496 EP - 500 JF - Parasitology research JO - Parasitol Res VL - 98 IS - 5 N2 - Fecal samples (n=1,584) for a parasite study were collected from Thoroughbred foals (n=349), 28 to 330 days old, on seven farms in central Kentucky during 49 monthly trips from May to October, November, or December 2004. The main purpose was to determine possible drug resistance of ascarids, also of strongyles, to ivermectin (IVM) and other commercially available compounds [fenbendazole, moxidectin (MOX), oxibendazole (OBZ), and pyrantel pamoate]. In addition, interest was on prevalence of foal parasites. Qualitative data were obtained by recording presence or absence of ascarid and strongyle eggs in feces from 7 to 25 days after treatment of some of the foals. None of the compounds completely eliminated ascarid eggs in feces of all foals posttreatment. Activity on ascarids was significantly the highest for OBZ and lowest for IVM. Activity on strongyles was significantly higher for IVM and MOX than for the other compounds. Prevalence (mean percentage of foals infected) was recorded for eggs of Parascaris equorum (39%), of strongyles (32%), and of Strongyloides westeri (2%) and oocysts of Eimeria leuckarti (28%) in feces of foals. One or more foals had infections of P. equorum on six farms (86%), strongyles on seven farms (100%), S. westeri on two farms (29%), and E. leuckarti on six farms (86%). The oldest foal infected with E. leuckarti was 301 days of age. Comparison was made on the prevalence of parasites in foals on five of the same farms in the 2004 study, which were part of a similar 14-farm project in 2003 (Lyons and Tolliver in Parasitol Res (2004) 92:400-404). SN - 0932-0113 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16385405/Field_studies_on_endoparasites_of_Thoroughbred_foals_on_seven_farms_in_central_Kentucky_in_2004_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-005-0091-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -