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Oestrogen receptor alpha and beta, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor mRNA and protein localisation within the developing ovary and in small growing follicles of sheep.
Reproduction. 2006 Jan; 131(1):81-92.R

Abstract

A first step to elucidating the roles that steroids may play in the processes of ovarian development and early follicular growth is to identify the cell types that are likely to be receptive to steroids. Thus, cell types expressing receptors for oestrogen (alpha and beta form; ERalpha and ERbeta respectively), androgen (AR) and progesterone (PR) were determined by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry in ovine ovarian tissues collected during ovarian development and follicular formation (days 26-75 of fetal life) as well as during the early stages of follicular growth. Expression of ERbeta was observed early during ovarian development and continued to be expressed throughout follicular formation and also during the early stages of follicular growth. ERbeta was identified in germ cells as well as in the granulosa cells. At the large preantral stage of follicular growth, expression of ERalpha was also consistently observed in granulosa cells. AR was first consistently observed at day 55 of fetal life in stroma cells throughout the ovary. Within the follicle, expression was observed in granulosa and thecal cells from the type-2 to -3 stage of follicular growth. PR mRNA did not appear to be expressed during ovarian development (days 26-75 of gestation). However, PR (mRNA and protein) was observed in the theca of type-3 (small preantral) and larger follicles, with mRNA -- but not protein -- observed in granulosa cells of some type-4 and 5 follicles. Expression of ERbeta, ERalpha and AR, as well as PR, was also observed in the surface epithelium and ovarian stroma of the fetal, neonatal and adult ovary. Thus, in sheep, steroid hormones have the potential to regulate the function of a number of different ovarian cell types during development, follicular formation and early follicular growth.

Authors+Show Affiliations

AgResearch, Wallaceville Animal Research Centre, Ward Street, PO Box 40063, Upper Hutt, New Zealand. jenny.juengel@agresearch.co.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16388012

Citation

Juengel, Jennifer L., et al. "Oestrogen Receptor Alpha and Beta, Androgen Receptor and Progesterone Receptor mRNA and Protein Localisation Within the Developing Ovary and in Small Growing Follicles of Sheep." Reproduction (Cambridge, England), vol. 131, no. 1, 2006, pp. 81-92.
Juengel JL, Heath DA, Quirke LD, et al. Oestrogen receptor alpha and beta, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor mRNA and protein localisation within the developing ovary and in small growing follicles of sheep. Reproduction. 2006;131(1):81-92.
Juengel, J. L., Heath, D. A., Quirke, L. D., & McNatty, K. P. (2006). Oestrogen receptor alpha and beta, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor mRNA and protein localisation within the developing ovary and in small growing follicles of sheep. Reproduction (Cambridge, England), 131(1), 81-92.
Juengel JL, et al. Oestrogen Receptor Alpha and Beta, Androgen Receptor and Progesterone Receptor mRNA and Protein Localisation Within the Developing Ovary and in Small Growing Follicles of Sheep. Reproduction. 2006;131(1):81-92. PubMed PMID: 16388012.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oestrogen receptor alpha and beta, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor mRNA and protein localisation within the developing ovary and in small growing follicles of sheep. AU - Juengel,Jennifer L, AU - Heath,Derek A, AU - Quirke,Laurel D, AU - McNatty,Kenneth P, PY - 2006/1/3/pubmed PY - 2006/7/4/medline PY - 2006/1/3/entrez SP - 81 EP - 92 JF - Reproduction (Cambridge, England) JO - Reproduction VL - 131 IS - 1 N2 - A first step to elucidating the roles that steroids may play in the processes of ovarian development and early follicular growth is to identify the cell types that are likely to be receptive to steroids. Thus, cell types expressing receptors for oestrogen (alpha and beta form; ERalpha and ERbeta respectively), androgen (AR) and progesterone (PR) were determined by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry in ovine ovarian tissues collected during ovarian development and follicular formation (days 26-75 of fetal life) as well as during the early stages of follicular growth. Expression of ERbeta was observed early during ovarian development and continued to be expressed throughout follicular formation and also during the early stages of follicular growth. ERbeta was identified in germ cells as well as in the granulosa cells. At the large preantral stage of follicular growth, expression of ERalpha was also consistently observed in granulosa cells. AR was first consistently observed at day 55 of fetal life in stroma cells throughout the ovary. Within the follicle, expression was observed in granulosa and thecal cells from the type-2 to -3 stage of follicular growth. PR mRNA did not appear to be expressed during ovarian development (days 26-75 of gestation). However, PR (mRNA and protein) was observed in the theca of type-3 (small preantral) and larger follicles, with mRNA -- but not protein -- observed in granulosa cells of some type-4 and 5 follicles. Expression of ERbeta, ERalpha and AR, as well as PR, was also observed in the surface epithelium and ovarian stroma of the fetal, neonatal and adult ovary. Thus, in sheep, steroid hormones have the potential to regulate the function of a number of different ovarian cell types during development, follicular formation and early follicular growth. SN - 1470-1626 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16388012/Oestrogen_receptor_alpha_and_beta_androgen_receptor_and_progesterone_receptor_mRNA_and_protein_localisation_within_the_developing_ovary_and_in_small_growing_follicles_of_sheep_ L2 - https://rep.bioscientifica.com/doi/10.1530/rep.1.00704 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -