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The association of race with frailty: the cardiovascular health study.
Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Jul; 16(7):545-53.AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Frailty, which has been conceptualized as a state of decreased physiologic reserve contributing to functional decline, has a prevalence among older African Americans that is twice that in older whites. This study assesses the independent contribution of race to frailty.

METHODS

We evaluated 786 African-American and 4491 white participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). Frailty is defined as meeting three or more of five criteria derived from CHS measures: lowest quintile for grip strength, self-reported exhaustion, unintentional weight loss of 10 lbs or greater in 1 year, slowest quintile for gait speed, and lowest quintile for physical activity. Controlling for age, sex, comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, and race, multinomial logistic regression estimated the odds ratio (OR) of prefrail (one or two criteria) to not frail and frail to not frail.

RESULTS

Among African Americans, 8.7% of men and 15.0% of women were frail compared with 4.6% and 6.8% of white men and women, respectively. In adjusted models, nonobese African Americans had a fourfold greater odds of frailty compared with whites. The increased OR of frailty associated with African-American race was less pronounced among those who were obese or disabled.

CONCLUSION

African-American race is associated independently with frailty.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Medicine, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. chhirsch@ucdavis.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16388967

Citation

Hirsch, Calvin, et al. "The Association of Race With Frailty: the Cardiovascular Health Study." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 16, no. 7, 2006, pp. 545-53.
Hirsch C, Anderson ML, Newman A, et al. The association of race with frailty: the cardiovascular health study. Ann Epidemiol. 2006;16(7):545-53.
Hirsch, C., Anderson, M. L., Newman, A., Kop, W., Jackson, S., Gottdiener, J., Tracy, R., & Fried, L. P. (2006). The association of race with frailty: the cardiovascular health study. Annals of Epidemiology, 16(7), 545-53.
Hirsch C, et al. The Association of Race With Frailty: the Cardiovascular Health Study. Ann Epidemiol. 2006;16(7):545-53. PubMed PMID: 16388967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of race with frailty: the cardiovascular health study. AU - Hirsch,Calvin, AU - Anderson,Melissa L, AU - Newman,Anne, AU - Kop,Willem, AU - Jackson,Sharon, AU - Gottdiener,John, AU - Tracy,Russell, AU - Fried,Linda P, AU - ,, Y1 - 2006/01/04/ PY - 2005/09/28/received PY - 2005/10/22/accepted PY - 2006/1/4/pubmed PY - 2006/9/30/medline PY - 2006/1/4/entrez SP - 545 EP - 53 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 16 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: Frailty, which has been conceptualized as a state of decreased physiologic reserve contributing to functional decline, has a prevalence among older African Americans that is twice that in older whites. This study assesses the independent contribution of race to frailty. METHODS: We evaluated 786 African-American and 4491 white participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). Frailty is defined as meeting three or more of five criteria derived from CHS measures: lowest quintile for grip strength, self-reported exhaustion, unintentional weight loss of 10 lbs or greater in 1 year, slowest quintile for gait speed, and lowest quintile for physical activity. Controlling for age, sex, comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, and race, multinomial logistic regression estimated the odds ratio (OR) of prefrail (one or two criteria) to not frail and frail to not frail. RESULTS: Among African Americans, 8.7% of men and 15.0% of women were frail compared with 4.6% and 6.8% of white men and women, respectively. In adjusted models, nonobese African Americans had a fourfold greater odds of frailty compared with whites. The increased OR of frailty associated with African-American race was less pronounced among those who were obese or disabled. CONCLUSION: African-American race is associated independently with frailty. SN - 1047-2797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16388967/The_association_of_race_with_frailty:_the_cardiovascular_health_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(05)00363-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -