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Associations between the use of complementary and alternative medications and demographic, health and lifestyle factors in mid-life Australian women.
Climacteric. 2005 Sep; 8(3):271-8.C

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medications (CAMs) used by menopausal women living in South-East Queensland, Australia; and profile the women who are using CAMs through sociodemographic characteristics, self-rated health status, lifestyle and preventative health strategies.

METHOD

This study was a secondary data analysis of data collected by postal questionnaire from 886 women aged 48-67 years participating in the Queensland Midlife Women's Health Study. The outcome measure was CAM use, distinguished by three categories: herbal therapies, phytoestrogens and nutritional intake (supplements and healthy eating).

RESULTS

The overall prevalence of CAM use among mid-life Australian women was 82% which included therapeutic techniques (83%), nutritional supplements (66.8%), phytoestrogens (55.8%), herbal therapies (41.3%), Evening Primrose oil (34%) and vitamin E (28.8%). CAM users, when compared to non-users, were more likely to be previous (p < 0.05) but not current users (p < 0.05) of hormone therapy (HT), higher educated (p < 0.05), low to middle income earners (p < 0.001) and have participated in self-breast examination (p < 0.01). They were also more likely to report good general health (p < 0.05) and improved physical functioning without limitations due to health (p < 0.05). CAM users were less likely to be aged over 55 years (p < 0.05) and smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH RESEARCH: As prevalence of current CAM use in this population group is considerably higher than HT use, health education programs to assist mid-life women to understand the scientific evidence (or lack of it) for their efficacy is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Health Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16390759

Citation

Gollschewski, S, et al. "Associations Between the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medications and Demographic, Health and Lifestyle Factors in Mid-life Australian Women." Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, vol. 8, no. 3, 2005, pp. 271-8.
Gollschewski S, Anderson D, Skerman H, et al. Associations between the use of complementary and alternative medications and demographic, health and lifestyle factors in mid-life Australian women. Climacteric. 2005;8(3):271-8.
Gollschewski, S., Anderson, D., Skerman, H., & Lyons-Wall, P. (2005). Associations between the use of complementary and alternative medications and demographic, health and lifestyle factors in mid-life Australian women. Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, 8(3), 271-8.
Gollschewski S, et al. Associations Between the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medications and Demographic, Health and Lifestyle Factors in Mid-life Australian Women. Climacteric. 2005;8(3):271-8. PubMed PMID: 16390759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between the use of complementary and alternative medications and demographic, health and lifestyle factors in mid-life Australian women. AU - Gollschewski,S, AU - Anderson,D, AU - Skerman,H, AU - Lyons-Wall,P, PY - 2006/1/5/pubmed PY - 2006/3/1/medline PY - 2006/1/5/entrez SP - 271 EP - 8 JF - Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society JO - Climacteric VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medications (CAMs) used by menopausal women living in South-East Queensland, Australia; and profile the women who are using CAMs through sociodemographic characteristics, self-rated health status, lifestyle and preventative health strategies. METHOD: This study was a secondary data analysis of data collected by postal questionnaire from 886 women aged 48-67 years participating in the Queensland Midlife Women's Health Study. The outcome measure was CAM use, distinguished by three categories: herbal therapies, phytoestrogens and nutritional intake (supplements and healthy eating). RESULTS: The overall prevalence of CAM use among mid-life Australian women was 82% which included therapeutic techniques (83%), nutritional supplements (66.8%), phytoestrogens (55.8%), herbal therapies (41.3%), Evening Primrose oil (34%) and vitamin E (28.8%). CAM users, when compared to non-users, were more likely to be previous (p < 0.05) but not current users (p < 0.05) of hormone therapy (HT), higher educated (p < 0.05), low to middle income earners (p < 0.001) and have participated in self-breast examination (p < 0.01). They were also more likely to report good general health (p < 0.05) and improved physical functioning without limitations due to health (p < 0.05). CAM users were less likely to be aged over 55 years (p < 0.05) and smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH RESEARCH: As prevalence of current CAM use in this population group is considerably higher than HT use, health education programs to assist mid-life women to understand the scientific evidence (or lack of it) for their efficacy is recommended. SN - 1369-7137 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16390759/Associations_between_the_use_of_complementary_and_alternative_medications_and_demographic_health_and_lifestyle_factors_in_mid_life_Australian_women_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13697130500186610 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -