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Part of the series: from dietary antioxidants to regulators in cellular signalling and gene expression. Role of reactive oxygen species and (phyto)oestrogens in the modulation of adaptive response to stress.
Free Radic Res. 2006 Feb; 40(2):111-9.FR

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not only toxic but play an important role in cellular signalling and in the regulation of gene expression. We, here, discuss two examples of improved adaptive response to an altered cellular redox state. First, differences in longevity between males and females may be explained by a higher expression of antioxidant enzymes in females resulting in a lower yield of mitochondrial ROS. Oestrogens are made responsible for these phenomena. Oestradiol induces glutathione peroxidase-1 and MnSOD by processes requiring the cell surface oestrogen receptor (ER) and the activation of pathways usually involved in oxidative stress response. Second, oxygen radicals produced during moderate exercise as performed during training up-regulate the expression of antioxidant enzymes in muscle cells. An increased level of these enzymes might prevent oxidative damage during exhaustive exercise and should, therefore, not be prevented by antioxidants. The relevance of these findings is discussed in the context with observations made in transgenic animals overexpressing MnSOD or catalase.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Fisiología, 46010, Valencia, Spain. jose.vina@uv.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16390819

Citation

Vina, Jose, et al. "Part of the Series: From Dietary Antioxidants to Regulators in Cellular Signalling and Gene Expression. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and (phyto)oestrogens in the Modulation of Adaptive Response to Stress." Free Radical Research, vol. 40, no. 2, 2006, pp. 111-9.
Vina J, Borras C, Gomez-Cabrera MC, et al. Part of the series: from dietary antioxidants to regulators in cellular signalling and gene expression. Role of reactive oxygen species and (phyto)oestrogens in the modulation of adaptive response to stress. Free Radic Res. 2006;40(2):111-9.
Vina, J., Borras, C., Gomez-Cabrera, M. C., & Orr, W. C. (2006). Part of the series: from dietary antioxidants to regulators in cellular signalling and gene expression. Role of reactive oxygen species and (phyto)oestrogens in the modulation of adaptive response to stress. Free Radical Research, 40(2), 111-9.
Vina J, et al. Part of the Series: From Dietary Antioxidants to Regulators in Cellular Signalling and Gene Expression. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and (phyto)oestrogens in the Modulation of Adaptive Response to Stress. Free Radic Res. 2006;40(2):111-9. PubMed PMID: 16390819.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Part of the series: from dietary antioxidants to regulators in cellular signalling and gene expression. Role of reactive oxygen species and (phyto)oestrogens in the modulation of adaptive response to stress. AU - Vina,Jose, AU - Borras,Consuelo, AU - Gomez-Cabrera,Mari-Carmen, AU - Orr,William C, PY - 2006/1/5/pubmed PY - 2006/3/17/medline PY - 2006/1/5/entrez SP - 111 EP - 9 JF - Free radical research JO - Free Radic Res VL - 40 IS - 2 N2 - There is increasing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not only toxic but play an important role in cellular signalling and in the regulation of gene expression. We, here, discuss two examples of improved adaptive response to an altered cellular redox state. First, differences in longevity between males and females may be explained by a higher expression of antioxidant enzymes in females resulting in a lower yield of mitochondrial ROS. Oestrogens are made responsible for these phenomena. Oestradiol induces glutathione peroxidase-1 and MnSOD by processes requiring the cell surface oestrogen receptor (ER) and the activation of pathways usually involved in oxidative stress response. Second, oxygen radicals produced during moderate exercise as performed during training up-regulate the expression of antioxidant enzymes in muscle cells. An increased level of these enzymes might prevent oxidative damage during exhaustive exercise and should, therefore, not be prevented by antioxidants. The relevance of these findings is discussed in the context with observations made in transgenic animals overexpressing MnSOD or catalase. SN - 1071-5762 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16390819/Part_of_the_series:_from_dietary_antioxidants_to_regulators_in_cellular_signalling_and_gene_expression__Role_of_reactive_oxygen_species_and__phyto_oestrogens_in_the_modulation_of_adaptive_response_to_stress_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10715760500405778 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -