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Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions: role of parents' and older siblings' smoking.
Addiction. 2006 Jan; 101(1):128-36.A

Abstract

AIMS

To use a novel social epidemic probability model to investigate longitudinally the extent to which parents' and older siblings' smoking predict children's smoking transitions.

DESIGN

Parents' and older siblings' smoking status was assessed when children were in 3rd grade (baseline). Three smoking transitions were assessed over the period of child/adolescent smoking acquisition (up to 12th grade): (1) transition from never smoking to trying smoking, (2) transition from trying to monthly smoking and (3) transition from monthly to daily smoking.

SETTING

Forty Washington State school districts participating in the long term Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project (HSPP).

PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS

Participants were the 5520 families for whom data on both parents' and older siblings' baseline smoking status, as well as on children's smoking transitions, were available.

FINDINGS

The probability that a smoking parent influenced their child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 32% (95% CI: 27%, 36%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 15% (95% CI: 10%, 19%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 28% (95% CI: 21%, 34%). The probability that an older sibling influenced a child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 29% (95% CI: 17%, 39%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 0% (95% CI: 0%, 8%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 20% (95% CI: 4%, 33%).

CONCLUSIONS

In contrast to previous research, the results provide new evidence suggesting that family smoking influences both initiation and escalation of children's smoking. Results also quantify, in terms of probabilities, the importance of parents' and older siblings' smoking on children's three major smoking transitions. Parents' smoking, as well as older siblings' smoking, are important behaviors to target in preventing adolescents from making smoking transitions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention Research Program, Division of Public Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA. jbricker@fhcrc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16393199

Citation

Bricker, Jonathan B., et al. "Prospective Prediction of Children's Smoking Transitions: Role of Parents' and Older Siblings' Smoking." Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 101, no. 1, 2006, pp. 128-36.
Bricker JB, Peterson AV, Leroux BG, et al. Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions: role of parents' and older siblings' smoking. Addiction. 2006;101(1):128-36.
Bricker, J. B., Peterson, A. V., Leroux, B. G., Andersen, M. R., Rajan, K. B., & Sarason, I. G. (2006). Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions: role of parents' and older siblings' smoking. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 101(1), 128-36.
Bricker JB, et al. Prospective Prediction of Children's Smoking Transitions: Role of Parents' and Older Siblings' Smoking. Addiction. 2006;101(1):128-36. PubMed PMID: 16393199.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions: role of parents' and older siblings' smoking. AU - Bricker,Jonathan B, AU - Peterson,Arthur V,Jr AU - Leroux,Brian G, AU - Andersen,M Robyn, AU - Rajan,K Bharat, AU - Sarason,Irwin G, PY - 2006/1/6/pubmed PY - 2006/4/14/medline PY - 2006/1/6/entrez SP - 128 EP - 36 JF - Addiction (Abingdon, England) JO - Addiction VL - 101 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS: To use a novel social epidemic probability model to investigate longitudinally the extent to which parents' and older siblings' smoking predict children's smoking transitions. DESIGN: Parents' and older siblings' smoking status was assessed when children were in 3rd grade (baseline). Three smoking transitions were assessed over the period of child/adolescent smoking acquisition (up to 12th grade): (1) transition from never smoking to trying smoking, (2) transition from trying to monthly smoking and (3) transition from monthly to daily smoking. SETTING: Forty Washington State school districts participating in the long term Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project (HSPP). PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: Participants were the 5520 families for whom data on both parents' and older siblings' baseline smoking status, as well as on children's smoking transitions, were available. FINDINGS: The probability that a smoking parent influenced their child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 32% (95% CI: 27%, 36%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 15% (95% CI: 10%, 19%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 28% (95% CI: 21%, 34%). The probability that an older sibling influenced a child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 29% (95% CI: 17%, 39%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 0% (95% CI: 0%, 8%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 20% (95% CI: 4%, 33%). CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to previous research, the results provide new evidence suggesting that family smoking influences both initiation and escalation of children's smoking. Results also quantify, in terms of probabilities, the importance of parents' and older siblings' smoking on children's three major smoking transitions. Parents' smoking, as well as older siblings' smoking, are important behaviors to target in preventing adolescents from making smoking transitions. SN - 0965-2140 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16393199/Prospective_prediction_of_children's_smoking_transitions:_role_of_parents'_and_older_siblings'_smoking_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0965-2140&date=2006&volume=101&issue=1&spage=128 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -