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[Alzheimer's disease and treatment of vascular risk factors].
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2005; 149(51):2844-9NT

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that vascular risk factors including hypertension, high cholesterol, hyperhomocysteinaemia and diabetes mellitus are connected to the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The risk of AD may be reduced by the treatment of hypertension prior to onset of cognitive impairment. One small randomised clinical trial has provided some evidence of beneficial effects on cognition of cholesterol-lowering drugs such as the statins in patients with AD. Treatment of hypertension, hyperhomocysteinaemia and diabetes mellitus with the aim of halting the progression of cognitive decline in AD is still under study and results are awaited. For the time being findings from the trials carried out thus far should be interpreted with care due to methodological shortcomings, both in study design and execution. In order to investigate the role of vascular risk factors both in the aetiology and treatment of AD, large prospective randomised trials with long-term follow-up of AD patients who have been diagnosed using revised uniform diagnostic criteria that take the heterogeneity of the disease into account, are necessary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Universitair Medisch Centrum St Radboud, Huispostnummer 326, Postbus gIoI, 6500 HB Nijmegen. h.deleeuw@neuro.umcn.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

dut

PubMed ID

16398165

Citation

de Leeuw, F E., et al. "[Alzheimer's Disease and Treatment of Vascular Risk Factors]." Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde, vol. 149, no. 51, 2005, pp. 2844-9.
de Leeuw FE, van Norden AG, van der Flier WM, et al. [Alzheimer's disease and treatment of vascular risk factors]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2005;149(51):2844-9.
de Leeuw, F. E., van Norden, A. G., van der Flier, W. M., Olde Rikkert, M. G., & Scheltens, P. (2005). [Alzheimer's disease and treatment of vascular risk factors]. Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde, 149(51), pp. 2844-9.
de Leeuw FE, et al. [Alzheimer's Disease and Treatment of Vascular Risk Factors]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2005 Dec 17;149(51):2844-9. PubMed PMID: 16398165.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Alzheimer's disease and treatment of vascular risk factors]. AU - de Leeuw,F E, AU - van Norden,A G W, AU - van der Flier,W M, AU - Olde Rikkert,M G M, AU - Scheltens,Ph, PY - 2006/1/10/pubmed PY - 2006/2/24/medline PY - 2006/1/10/entrez SP - 2844 EP - 9 JF - Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde JO - Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd VL - 149 IS - 51 N2 - There is increasing evidence that vascular risk factors including hypertension, high cholesterol, hyperhomocysteinaemia and diabetes mellitus are connected to the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The risk of AD may be reduced by the treatment of hypertension prior to onset of cognitive impairment. One small randomised clinical trial has provided some evidence of beneficial effects on cognition of cholesterol-lowering drugs such as the statins in patients with AD. Treatment of hypertension, hyperhomocysteinaemia and diabetes mellitus with the aim of halting the progression of cognitive decline in AD is still under study and results are awaited. For the time being findings from the trials carried out thus far should be interpreted with care due to methodological shortcomings, both in study design and execution. In order to investigate the role of vascular risk factors both in the aetiology and treatment of AD, large prospective randomised trials with long-term follow-up of AD patients who have been diagnosed using revised uniform diagnostic criteria that take the heterogeneity of the disease into account, are necessary. SN - 0028-2162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16398165/[Alzheimer's_disease_and_treatment_of_vascular_risk_factors]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alzheimersdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -