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Determinants of adult vaccination at inner-city health centers: a descriptive study.
BMC Fam Pract. 2006 Jan 10; 7:2.BF

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination rates among adults 65 years and older or less than 65 years with high risk medical conditions are still below Healthy People 2010 recommended levels of 90%. This study was designed to: 1) assess self-reported pneumococcal vaccination rates following health center level interventions to increase adult vaccination rates; and 2) determine factors associated with vaccination.

METHODS

Tailored interventions to increase immunizations were implemented at two inner-city health centers. We surveyed 375 patients 50 years of age and older. Multivariate logistic regression examines the predictors of 1) self-reported pneumococcal vaccination and 2) combined self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. Both of these models were stratified by age group (50-64 years and 65 years and older).

RESULTS

Pneumococcal vaccination rates were 45% by self-report, 55% by medical record review, 69% for patients 65 years old and older, 32% for patients 50-64 years; they did not differ by race. Receipt of the previous season's influenza vaccine was significantly related to pneumococcal vaccination among both younger and older patients. Receiving both the pneumococcal vaccine and the most recent influenza vaccine compared with receiving neither, among younger patients was related to unemployment, more frequent physician visits, and belief that those who do not receive the flu shot are more susceptible to the flu. For older patients, receipt of both vaccines was related to nonsmoking status, believing that friends/family think the patient should be vaccinated, seeing posters advertising flu shot clinics, and belief that those who do not receive the flu shot are more susceptible to the flu.

CONCLUSION

Our findings suggest that improving overall pneumococcal vaccination rates among eligible adults, has the potential to eliminate racial disparities. Interventions delivering vaccination messages specific to older and younger adult groups may be the best strategy for improving adult vaccination rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. tnowalk@pitt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16403215

Citation

Nowalk, Mary Patricia, et al. "Determinants of Adult Vaccination at Inner-city Health Centers: a Descriptive Study." BMC Family Practice, vol. 7, 2006, p. 2.
Nowalk MP, Zimmerman RK, Tabbarah M, et al. Determinants of adult vaccination at inner-city health centers: a descriptive study. BMC Fam Pract. 2006;7:2.
Nowalk, M. P., Zimmerman, R. K., Tabbarah, M., Raymund, M., & Jewell, I. K. (2006). Determinants of adult vaccination at inner-city health centers: a descriptive study. BMC Family Practice, 7, 2.
Nowalk MP, et al. Determinants of Adult Vaccination at Inner-city Health Centers: a Descriptive Study. BMC Fam Pract. 2006 Jan 10;7:2. PubMed PMID: 16403215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Determinants of adult vaccination at inner-city health centers: a descriptive study. AU - Nowalk,Mary Patricia, AU - Zimmerman,Richard K, AU - Tabbarah,Melissa, AU - Raymund,Mahlon, AU - Jewell,Ilene K, Y1 - 2006/01/10/ PY - 2005/08/04/received PY - 2006/01/10/accepted PY - 2006/1/13/pubmed PY - 2006/2/9/medline PY - 2006/1/13/entrez SP - 2 EP - 2 JF - BMC family practice JO - BMC Fam Pract VL - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination rates among adults 65 years and older or less than 65 years with high risk medical conditions are still below Healthy People 2010 recommended levels of 90%. This study was designed to: 1) assess self-reported pneumococcal vaccination rates following health center level interventions to increase adult vaccination rates; and 2) determine factors associated with vaccination. METHODS: Tailored interventions to increase immunizations were implemented at two inner-city health centers. We surveyed 375 patients 50 years of age and older. Multivariate logistic regression examines the predictors of 1) self-reported pneumococcal vaccination and 2) combined self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. Both of these models were stratified by age group (50-64 years and 65 years and older). RESULTS: Pneumococcal vaccination rates were 45% by self-report, 55% by medical record review, 69% for patients 65 years old and older, 32% for patients 50-64 years; they did not differ by race. Receipt of the previous season's influenza vaccine was significantly related to pneumococcal vaccination among both younger and older patients. Receiving both the pneumococcal vaccine and the most recent influenza vaccine compared with receiving neither, among younger patients was related to unemployment, more frequent physician visits, and belief that those who do not receive the flu shot are more susceptible to the flu. For older patients, receipt of both vaccines was related to nonsmoking status, believing that friends/family think the patient should be vaccinated, seeing posters advertising flu shot clinics, and belief that those who do not receive the flu shot are more susceptible to the flu. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that improving overall pneumococcal vaccination rates among eligible adults, has the potential to eliminate racial disparities. Interventions delivering vaccination messages specific to older and younger adult groups may be the best strategy for improving adult vaccination rates. SN - 1471-2296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16403215/Determinants_of_adult_vaccination_at_inner_city_health_centers:_a_descriptive_study_ L2 - https://bmcfampract.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2296-7-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -