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Catalytic amounts of fructose may improve glucose tolerance in subjects with uncontrolled non-insulin-dependent diabetes.
Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug; 25(4):617-21.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It was suggested that acute ingestion of small amounts of fructose can improve glucose homeostasis.

AIM

To study the effect of a long-term tri-daily supplementation of catalytic amounts of fructose on glucose tolerance of subjects with type 2 diabetes (NIDDM).

METHODS

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Twenty-six subjects with uncontrolled NIDDM as indicated by high levels of hemoglobin A1C (Hgb(A1c)) and 2-h postprandial glucose levels >200 mg% were assigned to either fructose or maltodextrin supplementation (7.5 g) tri-daily after each main meal. The subjects were challenged with a fixed meal and blood was drawn for determining levels of glucose, insulin and triglycerides before and 2 h after meal at baseline and 1 month after study entry. Blood was drawn for total cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), fructosamine and Hgb(A1C) before study entry and at 1, 2 and 3 months into the study.

RESULTS

No changes were observed in the difference between postprandial and pre-meal glucose, insulin or triglyceride levels in each group or between groups. No significant statistical differences were found in weight, total cholesterol, LDL-c and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in each group or between groups along the study period. After 1 month fructosamin levels decreased in the fructose-supplemented group but not in the maltodextrin-supplemented group (P<0.052). Hgb(A1C) levels decreased with time in both groups but were significantly lower at 2 months in the fructose group as compared to the maltodextrin group (P<0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

Subjects with NIDDM may benefit from daily supplementation of catalytic amounts of fructose in their diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Clinical Nutrition Unit, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 6 Weizmann Street, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel. vaisman@tasmc.health.gov.ilNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16403592

Citation

Vaisman, Nachum, et al. "Catalytic Amounts of Fructose May Improve Glucose Tolerance in Subjects With Uncontrolled Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 25, no. 4, 2006, pp. 617-21.
Vaisman N, Niv E, Izkhakov Y. Catalytic amounts of fructose may improve glucose tolerance in subjects with uncontrolled non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Clin Nutr. 2006;25(4):617-21.
Vaisman, N., Niv, E., & Izkhakov, Y. (2006). Catalytic amounts of fructose may improve glucose tolerance in subjects with uncontrolled non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 25(4), 617-21.
Vaisman N, Niv E, Izkhakov Y. Catalytic Amounts of Fructose May Improve Glucose Tolerance in Subjects With Uncontrolled Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes. Clin Nutr. 2006;25(4):617-21. PubMed PMID: 16403592.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Catalytic amounts of fructose may improve glucose tolerance in subjects with uncontrolled non-insulin-dependent diabetes. AU - Vaisman,Nachum, AU - Niv,Eva, AU - Izkhakov,Yelena, Y1 - 2006/01/05/ PY - 2005/07/05/received PY - 2005/11/22/accepted PY - 2006/1/13/pubmed PY - 2006/12/13/medline PY - 2006/1/13/entrez SP - 617 EP - 21 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: It was suggested that acute ingestion of small amounts of fructose can improve glucose homeostasis. AIM: To study the effect of a long-term tri-daily supplementation of catalytic amounts of fructose on glucose tolerance of subjects with type 2 diabetes (NIDDM). METHODS: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Twenty-six subjects with uncontrolled NIDDM as indicated by high levels of hemoglobin A1C (Hgb(A1c)) and 2-h postprandial glucose levels >200 mg% were assigned to either fructose or maltodextrin supplementation (7.5 g) tri-daily after each main meal. The subjects were challenged with a fixed meal and blood was drawn for determining levels of glucose, insulin and triglycerides before and 2 h after meal at baseline and 1 month after study entry. Blood was drawn for total cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), fructosamine and Hgb(A1C) before study entry and at 1, 2 and 3 months into the study. RESULTS: No changes were observed in the difference between postprandial and pre-meal glucose, insulin or triglyceride levels in each group or between groups. No significant statistical differences were found in weight, total cholesterol, LDL-c and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in each group or between groups along the study period. After 1 month fructosamin levels decreased in the fructose-supplemented group but not in the maltodextrin-supplemented group (P<0.052). Hgb(A1C) levels decreased with time in both groups but were significantly lower at 2 months in the fructose group as compared to the maltodextrin group (P<0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with NIDDM may benefit from daily supplementation of catalytic amounts of fructose in their diet. SN - 0261-5614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16403592/Catalytic_amounts_of_fructose_may_improve_glucose_tolerance_in_subjects_with_uncontrolled_non_insulin_dependent_diabetes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0261-5614(05)00224-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -