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17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in human endometrium and its disorders.
Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2006 Mar 27; 248(1-2):136-40.MC

Abstract

In situ estrogen metabolism and synthesis have been considered to play a very important role in the development and progression of human endometrial carcinoma. 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17-HSDs) are enzymes involved in the formation of active sex steroids, including testosterone, estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2). Estrogens are interchanged by two enzymes, 17-HSD types 1 and 2, type 1 converts E1 to E2, and type 2 does reverse actions. 17-HSD type 5 catalyzes the reduction of androstenedione to testosterone. 17-HSD type 2 expression was decreased through normal endometrium, hyperplasia and carcinoma accordingly. There was a significant inverse correlation between intratumoral E2 concentration and the level of 17-HSD type 2 mRNA in endometrial carcinoma. 17-HSD type 5 expression was significantly increased through normal endometrium, hyperplasia and carcinoma accordingly. These results indicated that 17-HSD types 2 and 5 play an important role in the regulation of in situ estrogen production in endometrial carcinoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16406263

Citation

Ito, Kiyoshi, et al. "17Beta-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases in Human Endometrium and Its Disorders." Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, vol. 248, no. 1-2, 2006, pp. 136-40.
Ito K, Utsunomiya H, Suzuki T, et al. 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in human endometrium and its disorders. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2006;248(1-2):136-40.
Ito, K., Utsunomiya, H., Suzuki, T., Saitou, S., Akahira, J., Okamura, K., Yaegashi, N., & Sasano, H. (2006). 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in human endometrium and its disorders. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, 248(1-2), 136-40.
Ito K, et al. 17Beta-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases in Human Endometrium and Its Disorders. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2006 Mar 27;248(1-2):136-40. PubMed PMID: 16406263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in human endometrium and its disorders. AU - Ito,Kiyoshi, AU - Utsunomiya,Hiroki, AU - Suzuki,Takashi, AU - Saitou,Sumika, AU - Akahira,Jun-Ichi, AU - Okamura,Kunihiro, AU - Yaegashi,Nobuo, AU - Sasano,Hironobu, Y1 - 2006/01/06/ PY - 2006/1/13/pubmed PY - 2006/6/1/medline PY - 2006/1/13/entrez SP - 136 EP - 40 JF - Molecular and cellular endocrinology JO - Mol Cell Endocrinol VL - 248 IS - 1-2 N2 - In situ estrogen metabolism and synthesis have been considered to play a very important role in the development and progression of human endometrial carcinoma. 17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17-HSDs) are enzymes involved in the formation of active sex steroids, including testosterone, estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2). Estrogens are interchanged by two enzymes, 17-HSD types 1 and 2, type 1 converts E1 to E2, and type 2 does reverse actions. 17-HSD type 5 catalyzes the reduction of androstenedione to testosterone. 17-HSD type 2 expression was decreased through normal endometrium, hyperplasia and carcinoma accordingly. There was a significant inverse correlation between intratumoral E2 concentration and the level of 17-HSD type 2 mRNA in endometrial carcinoma. 17-HSD type 5 expression was significantly increased through normal endometrium, hyperplasia and carcinoma accordingly. These results indicated that 17-HSD types 2 and 5 play an important role in the regulation of in situ estrogen production in endometrial carcinoma. SN - 0303-7207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16406263/17Beta_hydroxysteroid_dehydrogenases_in_human_endometrium_and_its_disorders_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0303-7207(05)00438-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -